Most parents think social media not a bad thing: survey

August 16, 2012
Most parents think social media not a bad thing: survey
Many believe it prepares their kids for future work world, broadens their thinking.

(HealthDay) -- A new survey finds that an overwhelming majority of parents think social media isn't necessarily a bad thing for their children.

Eighty-three percent of the parents questioned said the benefits are either equal to or outweigh the risks, according to Children's Mercy Hospitals and Clinics of Kansas City, Mo., which commissioned the survey.

The survey also finds that:

  • Of the parents surveyed, 72 percent said it's good preparation for future involvement in a technology-dependent work world for their kids to participate in social networking.
  • Roughly 57 percent thought helps kids be more open-minded, creative and worldly, while 59 percent believed it would help them work with others.
  • More than two-thirds of parents said children should be 13 or older to join Facebook. About two-thirds of parents with kids aged 12 or younger said they were worried about "sexting" or other as a result of social media; the number dropped to fewer than half for parents of kids aged 13 to 19.
  • Parents of younger kids were more worried than the parents of teenagers about cyber bullying, depression, and other problems.
The , conducted in June, included a national sample of 728 parents.

Explore further: Two-Thirds of kids with autism have been bullied: study

More information: For more about bullying, try the U.S. National Library of Medicine.


Related Stories

Two-Thirds of kids with autism have been bullied: study

March 30, 2012
(HealthDay) -- Nearly two-thirds of American children with autism have been bullied at some point in their lives, and these kids are bullied three times more often than their siblings without autism, a new survey finds.

Recommended for you

To reduce postoperative pain, consider sleep—and caffeine

August 18, 2017
Sleep is essential for good mental and physical health, and chronic insufficient sleep increases the risk for several chronic health problems.

Despite benefits, half of parents against later school start times

August 18, 2017
Leading pediatrics and sleep associations agree: Teens shouldn't start school so early.

Doctors exploring how to prescribe income security

August 18, 2017
Physicians at St. Michael's Hospital are studying how full-time income support workers hired by health-care clinics can help vulnerable patients or those living in poverty improve their finances and their health.

Schoolchildren who use e-cigarettes are more likely to try tobacco

August 17, 2017
Vaping - or the use of e-cigarettes - is widely accepted as a safer option for people who are already smoking.

Federal snack program does not yield expected impacts, researchers find

August 17, 2017
A well-intentioned government regulation designed to offer healthier options in school vending machines has failed to instill better snacking habits in a sample of schools in Appalachian Virginia, according to a study by ...

Study shows cigarette makers shifted stance on nicotine patches, gum

August 17, 2017
The use of nicotine patches, gum, lozenges, inhalers or nasal sprays—together called "nicotine replacement therapy," or NRT—came into play in 1984 as prescription medicine, which when combined with counseling, helped ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.