Most parents think social media not a bad thing: survey

August 16, 2012
Most parents think social media not a bad thing: survey
Many believe it prepares their kids for future work world, broadens their thinking.

(HealthDay) -- A new survey finds that an overwhelming majority of parents think social media isn't necessarily a bad thing for their children.

Eighty-three percent of the parents questioned said the benefits are either equal to or outweigh the risks, according to Children's Mercy Hospitals and Clinics of Kansas City, Mo., which commissioned the survey.

The survey also finds that:

  • Of the parents surveyed, 72 percent said it's good preparation for future involvement in a technology-dependent work world for their kids to participate in social networking.
  • Roughly 57 percent thought helps kids be more open-minded, creative and worldly, while 59 percent believed it would help them work with others.
  • More than two-thirds of parents said children should be 13 or older to join Facebook. About two-thirds of parents with kids aged 12 or younger said they were worried about "sexting" or other as a result of social media; the number dropped to fewer than half for parents of kids aged 13 to 19.
  • Parents of younger kids were more worried than the parents of teenagers about cyber bullying, depression, and other problems.
The , conducted in June, included a national sample of 728 parents.

Explore further: Two-Thirds of kids with autism have been bullied: study

More information: For more about bullying, try the U.S. National Library of Medicine.


Related Stories

Two-Thirds of kids with autism have been bullied: study

March 30, 2012
(HealthDay) -- Nearly two-thirds of American children with autism have been bullied at some point in their lives, and these kids are bullied three times more often than their siblings without autism, a new survey finds.

Recommended for you

When traveling on public transport, you may want to cover your ears

November 22, 2017
The noise levels commuters are exposed to while using public transport or while biking, could induce hearing loss if experienced repeatedly and over long periods of time, according to a study published in the open access ...

Different types of alcohol elicit different emotional responses

November 22, 2017
Different types of alcohol elicit different emotional responses, but spirits are most frequently associated with feelings of aggression, suggests research published in the online journal BMJ Open.

Air pollution linked to poorer quality sperm

November 22, 2017
Air pollution, particularly levels of fine particulate matter (PM2.5), is associated with poorer quality sperm, suggests research published online in Occupational & Environmental Medicine.

Sunrise and sunset guide daily activities of city-dwellers

November 21, 2017
Despite artificial lightning and social conventions, the dynamics of daylight still influence the daily activities of people living in modern, urban environments, according to new research published in PLOS Computational ...

Older men need more protein to maintain muscles

November 21, 2017
The amount of protein recommended by international guidelines is not sufficient to maintain muscle size and strength in older men, according to a new study.

Exercising and eating well are greater contributors to health than standing at work

November 21, 2017
By now you've probably heard the edict from the health community: Sitting is the new smoking. Perhaps you've converted to a standing desk, or maybe you have a reminder on your phone to get up once an hour and walk around ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.