Clopidogrel after MI less effective in diabetes patients

September 5, 2012
Clopidogrel after MI less effective in diabetes patients
Clopidogrel therapy following a heart attack does less to reduce the risk of death in patients with diabetes than in those without diabetes, according to a study published in the Sept. 5 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

(HealthDay)—Clopidogrel therapy following a heart attack does less to reduce the risk of death in patients with diabetes than in those without diabetes, according to a study published in the Sept. 5 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Charlotte Andersson, M.D., Ph.D., from Gentofte Hospital in Hellerup, Denmark, and colleagues analyzed data from the Danish nationwide administrative registries (2002 to 2009) for 58,851 patients hospitalized with incident (MI) who had survived and had not undergone 30 days after discharge.

The researchers found that recurrent MI occurred in 1,790 patients with diabetes (25 percent) and 7,931 patients without diabetes (15 percent); of these, 1,225 with (17 percent) and 5,377 without diabetes (10 percent) died. The unadjusted mortality rates (events/100 person-years) were 13.4 (95 percent confidence interval [CI], 12.8 to 14.0) versus 29.3 (95 percent CI, 28.3 to 30.4) for patients with diabetes treated with clopidogrel versus those not treated. The unadjusted mortality rates were 6.4 (95 percent CI, 6.3 to 6.6) versus 21.3 (95 percent CI, 21.0 to 21.7) for those patients without diabetes treated with clopidogrel versus those not treated. Clopidogrel was associated with significantly less effectiveness for all-cause mortality (hazard ratio, 0.89 [95 percent CI, 0.79 to 1.00] versus 0.75 [95 percent CI, 0.70 to 0.80]) and for (hazard ratio, 0.93 [95 percent CI, 0.81 to 1.06] versus 0.77 [95 percent CI, 0.72 to 0.83]) among patients with diabetes versus those without diabetes.

"Among patients with diabetes compared with patients without diabetes, the use of conventional clopidogrel treatment after MI was associated with lower reduction in the risk of all-cause death and cardiovascular death," the authors write.

Several authors disclosed financial ties to the pharmaceutical industry.

Explore further: Depression found to increase risk of death in diabetes

More information: Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Related Stories

Depression found to increase risk of death in diabetes

June 1, 2012

(HealthDay) -- For patients with type 2 diabetes, depression is associated with an increased risk of all-cause mortality, regardless of previous cardiovascular disease, according to a study published online May 22 in Diabetes ...

Combo of diabetes, depression increases post-MI mortality

February 27, 2012

(HealthDay) -- Having both diabetes and depression significantly increases the risk of dying in the years following a heart attack, beyond the increased risk from either condition alone, according to a study published in ...

Psoriasis tied to 14 other autoimmune diseases

June 15, 2012

(HealthDay) -- Patients with psoriasis have significantly higher odds for having at least one of 14 other autoimmune diseases, according to a study published online June 4 in the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology.

Computer-based screening may reduce teen substance abuse

May 8, 2012

(HealthDay) -- A computer-facilitated screening and provider brief advice (cSBA) system for primary care can increase adolescent receipt of substance use screening across a variety of practice settings, according to a study ...

Recommended for you

Diabetes app forecasts blood sugar levels

April 27, 2017

Columbia University researchers have developed a personalized algorithm that predicts the impact of particular foods on an individual's blood sugar levels. The algorithm has been integrated into an app, Glucoracle, that will ...

New blood test may better predict gestational diabetes

April 27, 2017

A new study led by researchers at Brigham and Women's Hospital has found that a single measurement of plasma glycated CD59 (GCD59), a novel biomarker for diabetes, at weeks 24-28 of gestation identified, with high sensitivity ...

Post-biotics may help shield obese from diabetes

April 20, 2017

You've heard of pre-biotics and pro-biotics, but now you'll be hearing a lot more about post-biotics. Researchers at McMaster University have begun to identify how post-biotics, or the by-products of bacteria, lower blood ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.