US approves less-invasive heart defibrillator

September 29, 2012

(AP)—The U.S. Food and Drug Administration says it has approved a first-of-a-kind heart-zapping implant from Boston Scientific that that does not directly touch the heart.

Implantable defibrillators use thin wires to send that disrupt dangerous . Surgeons have traditionally connected the wires to the heart through a blood vessel in the upper chest.

The new device from Boston Scientific uses wires that sit just below the skin's surface and do not need to be threaded through the heart's blood vessels.

Boston Scientific Corp. acquired the device through a $150 million buyout of Cameron Health. Under the terms of the deal, Boston Scientific will pay an additional $150 million for FDA approval, plus up to $1 billion in payments based on future sales figures.

Explore further: FDA approves innovative, non-invasive heart valve

shares

Related Stories

FDA approves innovative, non-invasive heart valve

November 2, 2011
(AP) -- Federal health officials have approved a first-of-a-kind artificial heart valve that can be implanted without major surgery, offering a new treatment option for patients who are too old or frail for the chest-cracking ...

Recommended for you

Two studies support intensive blood pressure control for long-term health, quality of life

August 23, 2017
Two studies provide additional support for lowering systolic blood pressure to an intensive goal of 120 mmHg - far below the standard guidelines of 140 mmHg - to reduce the risk of heart disease in high-risk patients with ...

Brain activity may be predictor of stress-related cardiovascular risk

August 23, 2017
The brain may have a distinctive activity pattern during stressful events that predicts bodily reactions, such as rises in blood pressure that increase risk for cardiovascular disease, according to new proof-of-concept research ...

Dramatic new studies into inflammation in the infarcted heart could lead to changes in therapy

August 23, 2017
A medical research collaborative has demonstrated that the response of the human heart to an infarction is very different than previously thought. The study, led by cardiologist Borja Ibáñez and published as two independent ...

'Shapeshifter' that regulates blood clotting is visually captured for the first time

August 23, 2017
We are normally born with a highly sophisticated array of molecules that act as "sentries," constantly scanning our bodies for injuries such as cuts and bruises. One such molecular sentry, known as von Willebrand factor (VWF), ...

New molecule may hold the key to triggering the regeneration and repair of damaged heart cells

August 21, 2017
New research has discovered a potential means to trigger damaged heart cells to self-heal. The discovery could lead to groundbreaking forms of treatment for heart diseases. For the first time, researchers have identified ...

Researchers investigate the potential of spider silk protein for engineering artificial heart

August 18, 2017
Ever more people are suffering from cardiac insufficiency, despite significant advances in preventing and minimising damage to the heart. The main cause of reduced cardiac functionality lies in the irreversible loss of cardiac ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.