Mortality from CVD in Brazil has increased 3.5 times more than in other developing countries

September 14, 2012

Despite Brazil's successful prevention campaigns which have contributed to a reduction in risk factors such as smoking, cardiovascular disease (CVD) remains the first cause of death in the country, at 32%. Tobacco consumption and decrease of salt in local diets are some of the risk factors that will be discussed at the 67th Annual Congress of the Brazilian Society of Cardiology (1) which takes place in Recife, Brazil from 14 to 17 September 2012. This meeting is the largest cardiology conference in Latin America. The Brazilian Society of Cardiology is an affiliated society of the European Society of Cardiology since 2009 and has around 13,000 members.

Brazil's fast development has brought many positive changes to people's lives, but the move from a rural to an urban society has introduced changes in eating and exercise patterns resulting in growing obesity, diabetes and dyslipidaemia in the 185 million population. in Brazil has increased 3.5 times more than in other developing countries (2) making prevention of CVD an urgent issue. The recently updated European Guidelines on CVD Prevention (3), will be part of the one-day educational session (4) presented in Recife by senior faculty of the ESC together with representatives of the host society. These Guidelines have been reformatted to help disseminate the information from to where it is needed: health professionals working in the field, politicians and the general public.

"Most of CVD related deaths could be prevented through the widespread adoption of simple interventions such as , improved diets and increased exercise. Evidence that CVD is caused by modifiable , comes from clinical trials and observational community studies," says Professor Panos Vardas, President of the ESC who is leading the European delegation to Brazil. "We will be promoting these and other ESC Guidelines in Brazil. Our agenda (4) also includes highlights from ESC Congress 2012 with the latest information in diagnosing and treating cardiovascular disease as well as "Meet the expert" sessions where ESC faculty will explain recent Clinical Trials that will impact practice."

In recent years, the Brazilian Society of Cardiology has also sought greater international collaboration. Jadelson Pinheiro de Andrade, President of the Brazilian Society of Cardiology said "We think this will be our most international congress ever. We are happy to welcome the ESC sessions once again. Exchanges with our European colleagues are stimulating and we are hoping to collaborate on projects concerning registries and surveys in the future."

The ESC's GSA Committee was established to meet demand for ESC science and knowledge outside of Europe, to build closer ties with international organisations, and to extend the ESC mission beyond its traditional borders.

"International collaboration is a key objective of the ESC. There are worrying and significant disparities in the way CVD is diagnosed and treated, both in developed and . We will only be able to fulfill our mission of reducing the burden of CVD by joining forces across frontiers, exchanging experiences and promoting education and research in the cardiovascular field.," concluded Prof Vardas.

Explore further: European and Brazilian cardiologists cooperate to reduce cardiovascular deaths

More information:

References

(1) congresso.cardiol.br/67/programacao.asp

(2) eurheartj.oxfordjournals.org/c … tent/31/13/1541.full and www.who.int/chp/chronic_diseas … ort/media/brazil.pdf

(3) www.escardio.org/guidelines-su … tion.aspx?hit=TLinks

(4) www.escardio.org/congresses/gl … l/Pages/welcome.aspx

Related Stories

European and Brazilian cardiologists cooperate to reduce cardiovascular deaths

September 12, 2011
Against a background of high mortality rates from cardiovascular disease (CVD) in Brazil, the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) is to deliver an educational programme at the 66th Annual Congress of the Brazilian Society ...

Increasing cardiovascular disease in China: Urgent need for prevention

October 12, 2011
At over 40%, the mortality rate due to cardiovascular disease (CVD) in China is amongst the highest in the world¹ and has been rightly described as an epidemic.

First joint ESC/EAS guidelines for the management of dyslipidaemias

June 28, 2011
Cardiovascular disease (CVD), driven by the global pandemics of obesity and diabetes, poses a daunting challenge to clinicians in the 21st century. Despite progress, there is still much to be done to improve the control of ...

Prevention is better than cure for killer cardiovascular disease

July 6, 2012
European experts in cardiovascular medicine will today gather at a two day symposium to address the national agenda on cardiovascular disease prevention, held at Imperial College London and sponsored by leading independent ...

Top cardiac electrophysiology congresses join forces

June 13, 2012
Nice, 13 June 2012: Europe's leading congresses in cardiac electrophysiology have agreed to hold a joint annual Congress during 2014-2017. The official agreement was signed by ESC-EHRA and CARDIOSTIM-REED on 13 June, during ...

Recommended for you

How genes and environment interact to raise risk of congenital heart defects

October 19, 2017
Infants of mothers with diabetes have a three- to five-fold increased risk of congenital heart defects. Such developmental defects are likely caused by a combination of genetic and environmental factors. However, the molecular ...

Mouse studies shed light on how protein controls heart failure

October 18, 2017
A new study on two specially bred strains of mice has illuminated how abnormal addition of the chemical phosphate to a specific heart muscle protein may sabotage the way the protein behaves in a cell, and may damage the way ...

Newborns with trisomy 13 or 18 benefit from heart surgery, study finds

October 18, 2017
Heart surgery significantly decreases in-hospital mortality among infants with either of two genetic disorders that cause severe physical and intellectual disabilities, according to a new study by a researcher at the Stanford ...

Saving hearts after heart attacks: Overexpression of a gene enhances repair of dead muscle

October 17, 2017
University of Alabama at Birmingham biomedical engineers report a significant advance in efforts to repair a damaged heart after a heart attack, using grafted heart-muscle cells to create a repair patch. The key was overexpressing ...

High blood pressure linked to common heart valve disorder

October 17, 2017
For the first time, a strong link has been established between high blood pressure and the most common heart valve disorder in high-income countries, by new research from The George Institute for Global Health at the University ...

Blood cancer gene could be key to preventing heart failure

October 16, 2017
A new study, published today in Circulation, shows that the gene Runx1 increases in damaged heart muscle after a heart attack. An international collaboration led by researchers from the University of Glasgow, found that mice ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.