In treated MS, early disease activity predicts poor outcome

September 27, 2012
In treated MS, early disease activity predicts poor outcome
After 15 years of follow-up, patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis who display disease activity despite treatment with interferon β-1a tend to have unfavorable long-term outcomes, according to research published online Sept. 13 in the Annals of Neurology.

(HealthDay)—After 15 years of follow-up, patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS) who display disease activity despite treatment with interferon (IFN)β-1a tend to have unfavorable long-term outcomes, according to research published online Sept. 13 in the Annals of Neurology.

Robert A. Bermel, M.D., of the Cleveland Clinic, and colleagues conducted a multicenter, observational, 15-year follow-up study involving 136 patients with RRMS, who had initially been treated with either intramuscular (IM) IFNβ-1a or placebo, to identify early predictors of long-term outcomes.

The researchers found that significantly fewer patients treated with IM IFNβ-1a had early disease activity. Of those treated with IFNβ-1a, activity was associated with an 8.96-fold higher risk of gadolinium-enhancing lesions, a 4.44-fold higher risk of relapse, and a 2.90-fold higher risk of new T2 lesions. Conversely, early disease activity in placebo-treated patients was not associated with long-term outcomes.

"Disease activity despite treatment with IFNβ is associated with unfavorable long-term outcomes. Particular attention should be paid to gadolinium-enhancing lesions on IFNβ therapy, as their presence strongly correlates with severe disability 15 years later," the authors write. "The results provide rationale for monitoring IFNβ treated patients with , and for changing therapy in patients with active disease."

This study was supported by Biogen Idec.

Explore further: Omega-3 fatty acids not associated with beneficial effects in multiple sclerosis: study

More information: Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Related Stories

Omega-3 fatty acids not associated with beneficial effects in multiple sclerosis: study

April 23, 2012
Omega-3 fatty acid supplements were not associated with beneficial effects on disease activity in patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis, according to a report of a randomized controlled trial published Online ...

Study examines fingolimod therapy in patients with multiple sclerosis

July 2, 2012
The medication fingolimod reduced inflammatory lesion activity and reduced brain volume loss in patients with multiple sclerosis who participated in a two-year placebo-controlled clinical trial and were assessed by magnetic ...

Fingolimod: 'Hint' of advantages in a small group of patients

July 5, 2012
The immunosuppressive drug fingolimod (trade name: Gilenya) is approved for the treatment of highly-active relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS) in adults. In an early benefit assessment pursuant to "Act on the Reform ...

Oral drug for MS significantly reduces disease activity and slows disability

April 11, 2011
The drug laquinimod reduced the number of relapses for people with multiple sclerosis (MS), in a large, long-term Phase III clinical study that will be presented as late-breaking research at the 63rd Annual Meeting of the ...

Recommended for you

Two Group A Streptococcus genes linked to 'flesh-eating' bacterial infections

September 22, 2017
Group A Streptococcus bacteria cause a variety of illnesses that range from mild nuisances like strep throat to life-threatening conditions including pneumonia, toxic shock syndrome and the flesh-eating disease formally known ...

Ecosystem approach makes urinary tract infection more treatable

September 22, 2017
The biological term 'ecosystem' is not usually associated with urinary tract infections, but this should change according to Wageningen scientists.

Residents: Frontline defenders against antibiotic resistance?

September 22, 2017
Antibiotic resistance continues to grow around the world, with sometimes disastrous results. Some strains of bacteria no longer respond to any currently available antibiotic, making death by infections that were once easily ...

Individualized diets for irritable bowel syndrome better than placebo

September 21, 2017
Patients with irritable bowel syndrome who follow individualized diets based on food sensitivity testing experience fewer symptoms, say Yale researchers. Their study is among the first to provide scientific evidence for this ...

Superbug's spread to Vietnam threatens malaria control

September 21, 2017
A highly drug resistant malaria 'superbug' from western Cambodia is now present in southern Vietnam, leading to alarming failure rates for dihydroartemisinin (DHA)-piperaquine—Vietnam's national first-line malaria treatment, ...

A dose of 'wait-and-see' reduces unnecessary antibiotic use

September 21, 2017
Asking patients to take a 'wait-and-see' approach before having their antibiotic prescriptions filled significantly reduces unnecessary use, a University of Queensland study has shown.

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.