Poorer patients find thyroid cancer at later stage: study

September 20, 2012
Poorer patients find thyroid cancer at later stage: study
Income-based health disparity needs addressing, researchers say.

(HealthDay)—Poorer people are more likely than the rich to receive a thyroid cancer diagnosis after the disease has progressed to a more advanced stage, according to a new study.

The study was scheduled for presentation Thursday at a meeting of the American Thyroid Association in Quebec City, Canada.

" is an important health indicator for a number of cancers and other diseases," the meeting's program co-chairwoman, Dr. Elizabeth Pearce, of the Boston Medical Center, said in an association news release. "These new data shed light on yet another area—the time of diagnoses—in which there is a need to close the gap on this disparity."

Using a large thyroid cancer registry in Canada, researchers led by Dr. Stan Van Umm, of the Schulich School of Medicine and Dentistry at the University of Western Ontario, analyzed information on the cancer status, sex, age and socioeconomic status of nearly 1,600 patients diagnosed with thyroid cancer between January 1998 and December 2010.

Compared to younger, richer patients, older people and those with a lower average household income were more likely to receive a thyroid after it had progressed. There is, however, a 4 percent annual decline in the odds of being diagnosed with advanced thyroid cancer in old age, which suggests the disease is being detected sooner over time, the researchers said.

The earlier cancer is diagnosed, the easier it is to treat. The U.S. estimates that more than 56,000 Americans will be diagnosed with thyroid cancer this year, and about 1,800 will die of it.

Data and conclusions presented at meetings should be considered preliminary until published in a peer-reviewed medical journal.

Explore further: Have no fear: Most cases of thyroid cancer do not affect survival

More information: The U.S. National Cancer Institute provides more information on thyroid cancer.

Related Stories

Have no fear: Most cases of thyroid cancer do not affect survival

June 11, 2012
Research presented at the Society of Nuclear Medicine's 59th Annual Meeting reveals that patients with differentiated thyroid cancer live as long as people in perfect health, unless they are in the minority and have reached ...

Thyroid cancer treatment varies by hospital, study finds

August 16, 2011
Where thyroid cancer patients go for care plays a large role in whether they receive radioactive iodine treatment, a new study from the University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center finds.

Study suggests obese patients have more advanced, aggressive papillary thyroid cancer

May 21, 2012
A review of medical records of patients treated at an academic tertiary care center suggests that obese patients present to their physicians with more advanced stage and more aggressive forms of papillary thyroid cancer (PTC), ...

African-Americans with thyroid cancer fare worse than whites

June 21, 2011
African-Americans have fewer incidences of thyroid cancer but have a more advanced form of the disease once they receive a diagnosis -- and are more likely to die from it, according to a new study.

Recommended for you

Researchers identify gene variants linked to a high-risk children's cancer

September 25, 2017
Pediatric researchers investigating the childhood cancer neuroblastoma have identified common gene variants that raise the risk of an aggressive form of that disease. The discovery may assist doctors in better diagnosing ...

Prostaglandin E1 inhibits leukemia stem cells

September 25, 2017
Two drugs, already approved for safe use in people, may be able to improve therapy for chronic myeloid leukemia (CML), a blood cancer that affects myeloid cells, according to results from a University of Iowa study in mice.

Cancer vaccines need to target T cells that can persist in the long fight against cancer

September 25, 2017
Cancer vaccines may need to better target T cells that can hold up to the long fight against cancer, scientists report.

Lung cancer treatment could be having negative health effect on hearts

September 25, 2017
Radiotherapy treatment for lung cancer could have a negative effect on the health of your heart new research has found.

MRI contrast agent locates and distinguishes aggressive from slow-growing breast cancer

September 25, 2017
A new magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agent being tested by researchers at Case Western Reserve University not only pinpoints breast cancers at early stages but differentiates between aggressive and slow-growing ...

Alternative splicing, an important mechanism for cancer

September 22, 2017
Cancer, which is one of the leading causes of death worldwide, arises from the disruption of essential mechanisms of the normal cell life cycle, such as replication control, DNA repair and cell death. Thanks to the advances ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.