Toll at 12 dead in Canada Legionnaire's disease outbreak

September 11, 2012

The death toll from an outbreak of Legionnaire's disease in Quebec City has risen to 12 since late July, health authorities in the Canadian city said Tuesday.

Officials said that 176 people have so far been diagnosed with the disease, which poses a risk for people with weak immune systems but can be treated with antibiotics.

Officials suspect improper maintenance of air conditioning systems as the cause of the outbreak.

Legionella bacteria grow in stagnant water, then spread as droplets are expelled by the appliances.

The illness, which has an of between two and 10 days, is an infection that causes , and pneumonia.

The disease was discovered in the United States in 1976 during a convention of the American Legion, an military veterans group, where 29 people died.

Explore further: 10 dead in Quebec Legionnaire's disease outbreak

Related Stories

10 dead in Quebec Legionnaire's disease outbreak

September 2, 2012
A Legionnaire's disease outbreak in Quebec City has killed 10 people since late July, health authorities in the francophone Canadian city said Saturday in an updated toll.

6 dead in Quebec Legionnaire's disease outbreak

August 24, 2012
Legionnaire's disease, which hit Quebec in mid-July, has infected 65 people and killed six, health authorities of the French-speaking Canadian province said.

US says Legionnaires cases triple over decade

August 18, 2011
(AP) -- Cases of Legionnaires' disease have tripled in the last decade, U.S. health officials said Thursday, but the risk of dying from it is lower because of more effective treatment.

Hong Kong probes deadly bug at government offices

January 4, 2012
Hong Kong officials said Wednesday the discovery of a bacteria that cause Legionnaires' disease at the new government complex was "under control", while it was probing the source of the deadly bug.

Number of UK Legionnaires' cases rises to 61

June 7, 2012
(AP) — Health officials on Thursday reported 61 confirmed and suspected cases of Legionnaires' disease in Scotland, an outbreak that has left one man dead.

Nevada officials: Luxor guests had Legionnaires'

January 30, 2012
(AP) -- Health officials in Las Vegas said Monday that the bacteria that causes Legionnaires' disease was found in water samples at the Luxor hotel-casino this month after a guest died of the form of pneumonia.

Recommended for you

Two Group A Streptococcus genes linked to 'flesh-eating' bacterial infections

September 22, 2017
Group A Streptococcus bacteria cause a variety of illnesses that range from mild nuisances like strep throat to life-threatening conditions including pneumonia, toxic shock syndrome and the flesh-eating disease formally known ...

Ecosystem approach makes urinary tract infection more treatable

September 22, 2017
The biological term 'ecosystem' is not usually associated with urinary tract infections, but this should change according to Wageningen scientists.

Residents: Frontline defenders against antibiotic resistance?

September 22, 2017
Antibiotic resistance continues to grow around the world, with sometimes disastrous results. Some strains of bacteria no longer respond to any currently available antibiotic, making death by infections that were once easily ...

Individualized diets for irritable bowel syndrome better than placebo

September 21, 2017
Patients with irritable bowel syndrome who follow individualized diets based on food sensitivity testing experience fewer symptoms, say Yale researchers. Their study is among the first to provide scientific evidence for this ...

Superbug's spread to Vietnam threatens malaria control

September 21, 2017
A highly drug resistant malaria 'superbug' from western Cambodia is now present in southern Vietnam, leading to alarming failure rates for dihydroartemisinin (DHA)-piperaquine—Vietnam's national first-line malaria treatment, ...

A dose of 'wait-and-see' reduces unnecessary antibiotic use

September 21, 2017
Asking patients to take a 'wait-and-see' approach before having their antibiotic prescriptions filled significantly reduces unnecessary use, a University of Queensland study has shown.

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.