Abraxane approved to treat advanced lung cancer

October 14, 2012
Abraxane approved to treat advanced lung cancer

(HealthDay)—Abraxane (paclitaxel protein-bound) has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration—in combination with the drug carboplatin—to treat advanced or spreading non-small cell lung cancer among people who aren't candidates for surgery or radiation therapy, the agency said Friday.

Abraxane was first approved in 2005 to treat breast cancer.

In a new clinical study of 1,038 people, the most common adverse reactions to the drug were anemia, loss of hair, nausea, fatigue, loss of appetite, irregularity, rash, and swelling.

Abraxane is produced by Celgene Corp., based in Summit, N.J.

Explore further: Afinitor approved for advanced breast cancer

More information: For more information about non-small cell lung cancer, visit the U.S. National Cancer Institute.


Related Stories

Afinitor approved for advanced breast cancer

July 23, 2012
(HealthDay) -- Afinitor (everolimus) has been approved in combination with the drug exemestane to treat postmenopausal women with advanced hormone-receptor positive, HER2-negative breast cancer, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration ...

Perjeta approved for advanced breast cancer

June 11, 2012
(HealthDay) -- Perjeta (pertuzumab) has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to treat people with HER2-positive late-stage breast cancer, the agency said in a news release.

FDA approves Roche skin cancer drug Erivedge

January 30, 2012
(AP) -- Federal regulators on Monday approved a pill that treats the most common type of skin cancer, basal cell carcinoma.

Older drug for advanced breast cancer beat newer, pricier meds

June 4, 2012
(HealthDay) -- Even in the field of cancer treatment, sometimes newer isn't necessarily better.

Zaltrap approved for advanced colorectal cancer

August 4, 2012
(HealthDay) -- Zaltrap (ziv-afilbercept) has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration in combination with a FOLFIRI chemotherapy regimen for adults with advanced metastatic (spreading) colorectal cancer, the ...

Stivarga approved for advanced colorectal cancer

September 27, 2012
(HealthDay)—Stivarga (regorafenib) has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to treat colorectal cancer that has spread despite prior treatment.

Recommended for you

Study prompts new ideas on cancers' origins

December 16, 2017
Rapidly dividing, yet aberrant stem cells are a major source of cancer. But a new study suggests that mature cells also play a key role in initiating cancer—a finding that could upend the way scientists think about the ...

What does hair loss have to teach us about cancer metastasis?

December 15, 2017
Understanding how cancer cells are able to metastasize—migrate from the primary tumor to distant sites in the body—and developing therapies to inhibit this process are the focus of many laboratories around the country. ...

Cancer immunotherapy may work better in patients with specific genes

December 15, 2017
Cancer cells arise when DNA is mutated, and these cells should be recognized as "foreign" by the immune system. However, cancer cells have found ways to evade detection by the immune system.

Scientists pinpoint gene to blame for poorer survival rate in early-onset breast cancer patients

December 15, 2017
A new study led by scientists at the University of Southampton has found that inherited variation in a particular gene may be to blame for the lower survival rate of patients diagnosed with early-onset breast cancer.

Scientists unlock structure of mTOR, a key cancer cell signaling protein

December 14, 2017
Researchers in the Sloan Kettering Institute have solved the structure of an important signaling molecule in cancer cells. They used a new technology called cryo-EM to visualize the structure in three dimensions. The detailed ...

'Bet hedging' explains the efficacy of many combination cancer therapies

December 14, 2017
The efficacy of many FDA-approved cancer drug combinations is not due to synergistic interactions between drugs, but rather to a form of "bet hedging," according to a new study published by Harvard Medical School researchers ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.