Abraxane approved to treat advanced lung cancer

October 14, 2012
Abraxane approved to treat advanced lung cancer

(HealthDay)—Abraxane (paclitaxel protein-bound) has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration—in combination with the drug carboplatin—to treat advanced or spreading non-small cell lung cancer among people who aren't candidates for surgery or radiation therapy, the agency said Friday.

Abraxane was first approved in 2005 to treat breast cancer.

In a new clinical study of 1,038 people, the most common adverse reactions to the drug were anemia, loss of hair, nausea, fatigue, loss of appetite, irregularity, rash, and swelling.

Abraxane is produced by Celgene Corp., based in Summit, N.J.

Explore further: Afinitor approved for advanced breast cancer

More information: For more information about non-small cell lung cancer, visit the U.S. National Cancer Institute.


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