Anergia prevalent in acute coronary syndrome patients

October 21, 2012

(HealthDay)—Anergia, or the lack of energy, is highly prevalent in patients with acute coronary syndromes (ACS), and correlates independently with several factors, including bodily pain and exercise participation, according to a study published in the Nov. 1 issue of The American Journal of Cardiology.

Jonathan A. Shaffer, Ph.D., of Columbia University in New York City, and colleagues conducted a study involving 472 hospitalized patients with ACS enrolled in a to evaluate the prevalence and clinical and demographic characteristics of anergia.

At least one instance of anergia was reported by 79.9 percent of patients, and 32 percent of patients met the established criteria for anergia. The researchers found that anergia correlated independently with being a woman, being white versus black, having bodily pain, participating in exercise, having current depressive disorder, and having elevated values on the Charlson Comorbidity Index, in a multivariable model.

"In conclusion, anergia is a highly prevalent syndrome in patients with ACS," the authors write. "It is distinct from depression and is associated with modifiable clinical factors such as participation in exercise and bodily pain that may be appropriate targets for intervention."

Explore further: Gender, high DAS28-P index predictive of pain in early RA

More information: Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Related Stories

Gender, high DAS28-P index predictive of pain in early RA

May 18, 2012
(HealthDay) -- For patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), female gender and having a high proportion of disease activity score (DAS28) attributable to patient-reported components (joint tenderness and visual analog score) ...

Inadequate pain meds in ER for patients with long-bone fractures

May 21, 2012
(HealthDay) -- The majority of patients with long-bone fractures receive inadequate pain medication in the emergency department, and disparities in management exist, according to a study published in the May issue of the ...

Recommended for you

Deadly heart rhythm halted by noninvasive radiation therapy

December 13, 2017
Radiation therapy often is used to treat cancer patients. Now, doctors at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have shown that radiation therapy—aimed directly at the heart—can be used to treat patients ...

Scientists rewrite our understanding of how arteries mend

December 13, 2017
Scientists from The University of Manchester have discovered how the severity of trauma to arterial blood vessels governs how the body repairs itself.

Ultra-thin tissue samples could help to understand and treat heart disease

December 12, 2017
A new method for preparing ultra-thin slices of heart tissue in the lab could help scientists to study how cells behave inside a beating heart.

Research reveals how diabetes in pregnancy affects baby's heart

December 12, 2017
Researchers at the Eli and Edythe Broad Center of Regenerative Medicine and Stem Cell Research at UCLA have discovered how high glucose levels—whether caused by diabetes or other factors—keep heart cells from maturing ...

Young diabetics could have seven times higher risk for sudden cardiac death

December 12, 2017
Young diabetics could have seven times more risk of dying from sudden cardiac arrest than their peers who don't have diabetes, according to new research.

Blood flow–sensing protein protects against atherosclerosis in mice

December 12, 2017
UCLA scientists have found that a protein known as NOTCH1 helps ward off inflammation in the walls of blood vessels, preventing atherosclerosis—the narrowing and hardening of arteries that can cause heart attacks and strokes. ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.