Argentina heart attack death rate nearly halved over 15 years

October 4, 2012

The 38th Argentine Congress of Cardiology takes place 5 to 7 October 2012 in Buenos Aires, Argentina. The event is organised by the Argentine Society of Cardiology, which is an affiliated member of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC)(2). The ESC will present a full day of scientific sessions at the event, on Saturday 6 October, as part of its Global Scientific Activities (GSA) programme. ESC Past-President Michel Komajda will head the European delegation.

Myocardial infarction remains one of the top causes of death in Argentina. According to results from the SCAR registry, the mortality rate of hospitalized because of acute myocardial infarction has dropped by 44% in the last 15 years, from 11.3% to 6.4%. The SCAR registry compared data from 733 patients in 47 centres in Argentina that participated in both registries of 1996 and 2011. The analysis was made using identical criteria for the definition of myocardial infarction and in both registries.

The registry also showed that there were 55% fewer smokers in 2011 compared to 1996. But over that 15 year period there was a 30% increase in patients with and a 53% increase in patients with background hypertension.

Dr Villarreal said: "In the last 15 years we have seen a dramatic decrease in smoking in patients admitted for acute myocardial infarction. This coincides with a moderate decrease in smoking habits in Argentina."

In 2011 a higher proportion of patients had previous infarction and (angioplasty and ). In 2011 there was also an increase in patients previously treated with aspirin, betablockers, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and statins.

The study also found a substantial reduction (59%) in mortality in the group of patients that were reperfused. Although there was no increase in the total number of patients who received reperfusion treatment, in eligible patients with ST segment elevation the rate of reperfusion increased from 65% to 85%. There was a higher use of primary or direct coronary angioplasty, aspirin, betablockers, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and statins.

Dr Villarreal said: "Results from the SCAR registry show that treatment for in Argentina has improved over the past 15 years, with greater use of recommended treatments and medications. Clinicians should now focus their efforts on facilitating the access of patients with to rapid reperfusion therapy and on extending the benefits of evidence based therapies to all patients."

Dr Jorge A.Belardi, President Elect 2013 of the Argentine Society of and President of the Scientific Committee of the 38th Argentine Congress of Cardiology, said: "The Argentine Society of Cardiology is committed to working to reduce cardiovascular mortality in our country. Our priorities will be primary prevention, working directly with the community, the government and the food industry. We will also focus on continuous medical education, with high adherence to medical guidelines, among other policies."

Prof Michel Komajda, Past-President of the ESC who is heading the European delegation said: "CVD is a global challenge. The ESC is proud to be working with its affiliate societies to spread key prevention messages. The ESC's Global Scientific Activities project aims to create a truly international cardiology community and to build on our history of successful cooperation with national societies beyond Europe."

The congress follows the launch of the Argentine Foundation of Cardiology campaign "El corazón de una mujer puede romperse EN SERIO" (A woman's heart can be broken SERIOUSLY). Women with heart disease seek medical help two hours later than men on average. The campaign aims to increase awareness of the problem of heart disease in women so that they receive earlier and better access to treatment and adopt heart healthy behaviours. Under the artistic direction of photographer Andy Cherniasvsky, the campaign will display photos and videos of local celebrities, plus a heart attack survivor, on public streets and television stations across Argentina.

Explore further: Increasing cardiovascular disease in China: Urgent need for prevention

Related Stories

Increasing cardiovascular disease in China: Urgent need for prevention

October 12, 2011
At over 40%, the mortality rate due to cardiovascular disease (CVD) in China is amongst the highest in the world¹ and has been rightly described as an epidemic.

Optimal reperfusion in ST-elevation myocardial infarction

August 30, 2011
Primary PCI is the best reperfusion therapy for patients presenting with acute ST-elevation myocardial infarction. CJ Terkelsen and co-workers used the Western Denmark Heart Registry to describe the implementation of primary ...

European and Brazilian cardiologists cooperate to reduce cardiovascular deaths

September 12, 2011
Against a background of high mortality rates from cardiovascular disease (CVD) in Brazil, the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) is to deliver an educational programme at the 66th Annual Congress of the Brazilian Society ...

Study examines factors associated with improvement in survival from heart attack in France

August 27, 2012
The overall rate of death in patients hospitalized with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI; a certain pattern on an electrocardiogram following a heart attack) decreased from 1995 to 2010 in France, with possible ...

What do patients receiving optimal medical therapy after a heart attack die from?

August 30, 2011
Because of improved management at the acute stage, the risk of dying in hospital after a heart attack has decreased by about 50% in the past 10 years. Likewise, the prescription of recommended medications when patients leave ...

Canadian Journal of Cardiology publishes report on delayed vs. immediate coronary stenting

October 19, 2011
The Canadian Journal of Cardiology has published a paper on the timing of coronary stenting, a thought-provoking paper that challenges one of the dogmas of acute heart attack management today.

Recommended for you

Could aggressive blood pressure treatments lead to kidney damage?

July 18, 2017
Aggressive combination treatments for high blood pressure that are intended to protect the kidneys may actually be damaging the organs, new research from the University of Virginia School of Medicine suggests.

Quantifying effectiveness of treatment for irregular heartbeat

July 17, 2017
In a small proof-of-concept study, researchers at Johns Hopkins report a complex mathematical method to measure electrical communications within the heart can successfully predict the effectiveness of catheter ablation, the ...

Concerns over side effects of statins stopping stroke survivors taking medication

July 17, 2017
Negative media coverage of the side effects associated with taking statins, and patients' own experiences of taking the drugs, are among the reasons cited by stroke survivors and their carers for stopping taking potentially ...

Study discovers anticoagulant drugs are being prescribed against safety advice

July 17, 2017
A study by researchers at the University of Birmingham has shown that GPs are prescribing anticoagulants to patients with an irregular heartbeat against official safety advice.

Protein may protect against heart attack

July 14, 2017
DDK3 could be used as a new therapy to stop the build-up of fatty material inside the arteries

Heart study finds faulty link between biomarkers and clinical outcomes

July 14, 2017
Surrogate endpoints (biomarkers), which are routinely used in clinical research to test new drugs, should not be trusted as the ultimate measure to approve new health interventions in cardiovascular medicine, according to ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.