Diverse forms of distress have distinct impact in diabetes

October 10, 2012
Diverse forms of distress have distinct impact in diabetes
In primary care patients with type 2 diabetes, depressive symptoms are predictive of future lifestyle-oriented self-management behaviors, while diabetes-related distress predicts glycemic control, possibly due to medication adherence, according to research published online Oct. 1 in Diabetes Care.

(HealthDay)—In primary care patients with type 2 diabetes, depressive symptoms (DS) are predictive of future lifestyle-oriented self-management behaviors, while diabetes-related distress (DRD) predicts glycemic control, possibly due to medication adherence, according to research published online Oct. 1 in Diabetes Care.

James E. Aikens, Ph.D., from the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor, conducted a longitudinal, six-month study involving 253 primary care patients with type 2 diabetes to compare DS and DRD as longitudinal predictors of medication adherence, self-care behavior, and glycemic control.

Aikens found that the results were similar with cross-sectional and longitudinal analyses. In longitudinal analyses, DS alone correlated significantly with future diet behavior, physical activity and . DRD alone was a significant predictor of future glycemic control and medication adherence.

"This study provides longitudinal support for the conceptual and empirical distinctions between DS and DRD in type 2 diabetes. DS may selectively suppress lifestyle-oriented self-management behaviors such as healthy eating, glucose testing, and exercise," Aikens concludes. "In contrast, diabetes-specific distress may impact subsequent and glycemic control. Clinical assessment and intervention should encompass both factors."

Explore further: Nonsupportive family members sabotage diabetes self-Care

More information: Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Related Stories

Nonsupportive family members sabotage diabetes self-Care

May 2, 2012
(HealthDay) -- Diabetes patients with nonsupportive family members are less adherent to their diabetes medication regimen and have worse glycemic control, according to a study published online April 26 in Diabetes Care.

Study assesses glucose monitoring trends in tweens

April 12, 2012
(HealthDay) -- During the transition to adolescence, children with type 1 diabetes monitor their blood glucose less frequently, resulting in significant increases in HbA1c levels, according to research published online April ...

Glycemic variability affects mood and quality of life

May 10, 2012
(HealthDay) -- Glycemic variability appears to be associated with lower quality of life and negative moods in women with type 2 diabetes, according to a study published in the March 30 issue of Diabetes Technology & Therapeutics.

Isomaltulose doesn't improve glycemic control in diabetes

April 13, 2012
(HealthDay) -- For patients with type 2 diabetes, substitution of sucrose with isomaltulose is not associated with improved glycemic control (measured by hemoglobin A1c [HbA1c] levels) at 12 weeks, according to a study published ...

Recommended for you

Personalized blood sugar goals can save diabetes patients thousands

December 11, 2017
A cost analysis by researchers at the University of Chicago Medicine shows treatment plans that set individualized blood sugar goals for diabetes patients, tailored to their age and health history, can save $13,546 in health ...

Kidney disease increases risk of diabetes, study shows

December 11, 2017
Diabetes is known to increase a person's risk of kidney disease. Now, a new study from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis suggests that the converse also is true: Kidney dysfunction increases the risk of ...

Type 2 diabetes is not for life

December 5, 2017
Almost half of the patients with Type 2 diabetes supported by their GPs on a weight loss programme were able to reverse their diabetes in a year, a study has found.

Skipping breakfast disrupts 'clock genes' that regulate body weight

November 30, 2017
Irregular eating habits such as skipping breakfast are often associated with obesity, type 2 diabetes, hypertension and cardiovascular disease, but the precise impact of meal times on the body's internal clock has been less ...

Type 2 diabetes has hepatic origins

November 28, 2017
Affecting as many as 650 million people worldwide, obesity has become one of the most serious global health issues. Among its detrimental effects, it increases the risk of developing metabolic conditions, and primarily type ...

Critical link between obesity and diabetes has been identified

November 28, 2017
UT Southwestern researchers have identified a major mechanism by which obesity causes type 2 diabetes, which is a common complication of being overweight that afflicts more than 30 million Americans and over 400 million ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.