Grape consumption associated with healthier dietary patterns

October 10, 2012

In a new observational study presented today at the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics Food and Nutrition Conference and Exposition (FNCE) in Philadelphia, PA, researchers looked at the association of grape consumption, in the non-alcoholic forms most commonly consumed – fresh grapes, raisins and 100% grape juice – with the diet quality of a recent, nationally representative sample of U.S. children and adults. Their findings suggest that, among adults and children, consumption of grapes and grape products is associated with healthier dietary patterns and increased nutrient intake.

Researchers analyzed the diets of more than 21,800 children and adults using data from the 2003-2008 National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys (NHANES) and found that consumers of grapes and grape products had increased intakes of total and whole fruit, as well as dietary fiber, calcium, magnesium, potassium and vitamins A, C, and B₆, versus nonconsumers. Dietary fiber, calcium and potassium are especially important, as most Americans are currently not getting enough of these in their daily diets.

Adult grape and grape product consumers also had increased intakes of vegetables, , nuts and seeds along with lower intakes of total fat, saturated fat and cholesterol, versus nonconsumers.

"It is interesting to note that not only did grape consumers have increased intakes of healthy foods, critical vitamins and minerals," said presenter Carla McGill, PhD, "but grape consumers also ate less of the unhealthy foods, specifically solid fat and added sugars."

This new study complements an extensive body of research supporting the role grapes, raisins and 100% grape juice can play in a healthy lifestyle.

"It reinforces the association between grapes and a healthier diet, which is good news for consumers," said Jean-Mari Peltier, Executive Director of the National Grape and Wine Initiative (NGWI). "Grapes, raisins and 100% grape juice are all foods that people enjoy eating, and this information adds another dimension to the grape and health story."

Related Stories

Recommended for you

To reduce postoperative pain, consider sleep—and caffeine

August 18, 2017
Sleep is essential for good mental and physical health, and chronic insufficient sleep increases the risk for several chronic health problems.

Despite benefits, half of parents against later school start times

August 18, 2017
Leading pediatrics and sleep associations agree: Teens shouldn't start school so early.

Doctors exploring how to prescribe income security

August 18, 2017
Physicians at St. Michael's Hospital are studying how full-time income support workers hired by health-care clinics can help vulnerable patients or those living in poverty improve their finances and their health.

Schoolchildren who use e-cigarettes are more likely to try tobacco

August 17, 2017
Vaping - or the use of e-cigarettes - is widely accepted as a safer option for people who are already smoking.

Federal snack program does not yield expected impacts, researchers find

August 17, 2017
A well-intentioned government regulation designed to offer healthier options in school vending machines has failed to instill better snacking habits in a sample of schools in Appalachian Virginia, according to a study by ...

In a nutshell: Walnuts activate brain region involved in appetite control

August 17, 2017
Packed with nutrients linked to better health, walnuts are also thought to discourage overeating by promoting feelings of fullness. Now, in a new brain imaging study, researchers at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC) ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.