Medical marijuana advocates want drug reclassified

October 16, 2012 by Frederic J. Frommer

(AP)—A federal appeals court in Washington is considering whether marijuana should be reclassified from its current status as a dangerous drug with no accepted medical use.

Last year, the rejected a petition by medical marijuana advocates to change the classification—thus keeping marijuana in the same category as drugs such as heroin. The DEA concluded that there wasn't a consensus of medical opinion on using marijuana for medical purposes.

Advocates want the U.S. for the District of Columbia Circuit to force the agency to hold a hearing and conduct findings based on the scientific record.

A lawyer for the advocates told the judges on Tuesday that the DEA has misapplied the law. A government lawyer urged the court to deny the request.

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