Negative pigment network able to distinguish melanoma

October 25, 2012
Negative pigment network able to distinguish melanoma
Negative pigment network can be used to distinguish melanoma from Spitz nevus and other benign lesions, according to a study published online Oct. 11 in the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology.

(HealthDay)—Negative pigment network (NPN) can be used to distinguish melanoma from Spitz nevus and other benign lesions, according to a study published online Oct. 11 in the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology.

Maria A. Pizzichetta, M.D., from the in Aviano, Italy, and colleagues assessed the frequency, sensitivity, specificity, and odds of NPN in digitalized images of from 679 patients with histopathological diagnosis of dermatofibroma (115), melanocytic nevus (220), Spitz nevus (139), and (205).

The researchers found that the frequency of NPN was higher in the melanoma group (34.6 percent) than in the Spitz nevus (28.8 percent), melanocytic nevus (18.2 percent), and dermatofibroma (11.3 percent) groups. The odds of melanoma diagnosis versus non-melanoma diagnosis in the presence of NPN were significantly increased (odds ratio, 1.8). For melanocytic nevi and dermatofibromas, the odds ratios were very low (0.5 and 0.3, respectively), while for Spitz nevi, the odds ratio of 1.1 was not statistically significant. There was a significantly higher frequency of multicomponent pattern (68.1 percent), asymmetric pigmentation (92.9 percent), irregularly distributed NPN (87.3 percent), and peripheral location of NPN (66.2 percent) in melanomas compared to dermatofibroma, melanocytic nevus, and Spitz nevus.

"The overall morphologic pattern of NPN, such as the irregular distribution and the peripheral location of NPN, along with the multicomponent pattern and the asymmetric pigmentation could be used as additional features in distinguishing melanoma from Spitz nevus and other ," the authors write.

Explore further: Pathologists tend to reclassify prior nonmalignant diagnoses

More information: Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Related Stories

Pathologists tend to reclassify prior nonmalignant diagnoses

August 17, 2012
(HealthDay) -- For dermatopathologists there is a trend toward reclassification of prior nonmalignant diagnoses of severely atypical dysplastic nevi as malignant, according to a study published in the September issue of the ...

Accuracy of melanoma detection up in specialized clinics

June 21, 2012
(HealthDay) -- From 1998 to 2007, the accuracy of melanoma detection improved in specialized but not non-specialized clinical settings, according to research published in the July issue of the Journal of the American Academy ...

Recommended for you

How cancer metastasis happens: Researchers reveal a key mechanism

January 18, 2018
Cancer metastasis, the migration of cells from a primary tumor to form distant tumors in the body, can be triggered by a chronic leakage of DNA within tumor cells, according to a team led by Weill Cornell Medicine and Memorial ...

Modular gene enhancer promotes leukemia and regulates effectiveness of chemotherapy

January 18, 2018
Every day, billions of new blood cells are generated in the bone marrow. The gene Myc is known to play an important role in this process, and is also known to play a role in cancer. Scientists from the German Cancer Research ...

These foods may up your odds for colon cancer

January 18, 2018
(HealthDay)—Chowing down on red meat, white bread and sugar-laden drinks might increase your long-term risk of colon cancer, a new study suggests.

The pill lowers ovarian cancer risk, even for smokers

January 18, 2018
(HealthDay)—It's known that use of the birth control pill is tied to lower odds for ovarian cancer, but new research shows the benefit extends to smokers or women who are obese.

Researchers develop swallowable test to detect pre-cancerous Barrett's esophagus

January 17, 2018
Investigators at Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine and University Hospitals Cleveland Medical Center have developed a simple, swallowable test for early detection of Barrett's esophagus that offers promise ...

Scientists zoom in to watch DNA code being read

January 17, 2018
Scientists have unveiled incredible images of how the DNA code is read and interpreted—revealing new detail about one of the fundamental processes of life.

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.