Providers needed for treatment of fatal non-communicable diseases in Bangladesh

October 12, 2012

Although non-communicable diseases account for a significant burden of deaths among women of reproductive age in low-income countries, little is known about how women and their families seek care for these diseases. A study conducted by researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health found that a majority of women who died from non-communicable diseases in rural Bangladesh between 2001 and 2007 first visited traditional healers and untrained village doctors, with only a quarter of women seeking care from medically certified providers. Families cited distance to facilities, cost of services and lack of recognition of the severity of their conditions as barriers to receiving medical care.

Using the pregnancy surveillance infrastructure of the JiVitA-1 community trial in northwest rural Bangladesh, Shegufta Sikder, a PhD candidate in the Epidemiology and Control Program of the Department of International , analyzed care-seeking patterns among 250 women who suffered from fatal non-communicable diseases. Beyond the initial point of care, women appeared to switch to medically certified practitioners when treatment from non-certified providers failed to resolve their illnesses. However, the women typically reached medically certified providers in advanced stages of disease and were usually told that treatment was not possible or were referred to higher-level facilities that they could not afford to visit.

Recognizing the current global attention to non-communicable diseases following the 2011 United Nations summit on the issue, this Johns Hopkins research highlights the importance of addressing the burden of non-communicable disease mortality among . "Improvements in early detection, appropriate care seeking, and service delivery are needed to advance treatment options for NCDs in resource-poor settings," said class="apple-converted-space" Alain Labrique, PhD, assistant professor in the Bloomberg School's Department of International Health and corresponding author of the study. "While maternal health and safe pregnancy remain vital to the health of women of reproductive age, increased attention is needed to addressing non-communicable diseases among this population in resource-poor settings."

"Care seeking patterns for fatal non-communicable diseases among women of reproductive age in rural northwest Bangladesh" was published in the August 2012 edition of Biomed Central 's Health and written by Shegufta S. Sikder, Alain B. Labrique, Barkat Ullah, Sucheta Mehra, Mahbubur Rashid, Hasmot Ali, Nusrat Jahan, Abu A. Shamim, Keith P. West, Jr., and Parul Christian.

Explore further: Non-certified providers provide initial care in Bangladesh

Related Stories

Non-certified providers provide initial care in Bangladesh

January 24, 2012
(Medical Xpress) -- In rural Bangladesh, non-certified providers such as village doctors and untrained birth attendants are the first-line providers for women with severe obstetric complications, according to a new study ...

UN summit on non-communicable diseases should learn from global AIDS response

September 6, 2011
As the world prepares to develop a global strategy to tackle some of the biggest current threats to human health, there is a lot to be learned from past successes and mistakes of the global response to HIV/AIDS.

How well is depression in women being diagnosed and treated?

August 20, 2012
Major depression affects as many as 16% of reproductive-aged women in the U.S. Yet pregnant women have a higher rate of undiagnosed depression than nonpregnant women, according to a study published in Journal of Women's Health.

Study highlights the burden of epilepsy in the developing world

September 27, 2012
The burden of epilepsy in poorer parts of the world could be readily alleviated by reducing the preventable causes and improving access to treatment, according to a review article published today in the Lancet.

Non-communicable diseases having devastating global impact

August 30, 2012
Non-communicable diseases (NCDs) such as heart disease, cancer and diabetes are no longer just a problem in wealthy nations – the rate of NCDs in low-to-middle income countries are increasing faster than in developed countries.

Timing pregnancy an important health concern for women

April 11, 2012
A newly published article in the journal Nursing for Women's Health highlights the importance of a woman's ability to time her childbearing. The author asserts that contraception is a means of health promotion and women who ...

Recommended for you

Study finds 275,000 calls to poison control centers for dietary supplement exposures from 2000 through 2012

July 24, 2017
U.S. Poison Control Centers receive a call every 24 minutes, on average, regarding dietary supplement exposures, according to a new study from the Center for Injury Research and Policy and the Central Ohio Poison Center, ...

Alcohol to claim 63,000 lives over next five years, experts warn

July 24, 2017
Alcohol consumption will cause 63,000 deaths in England over the next five years – the equivalent of 35 deaths a day – according to a new report from the University of Sheffield Alcohol Research Group.

App lets patients work alone or with others to prevent, monitor, and reverse chronic disease

July 24, 2017
Lack of patient adherence to treatment plans is a lingering, costly problem in the United States. But MIT Media Lab spinout Twine Health is proving that regular interventions from a patient's community of supporters can greatly ...

Alcohol boosts recall of earlier learning

July 24, 2017
Drinking alcohol improves memory for information learned before the drinking episode began, new research suggests.

To combat teen smoking, health experts recommend R ratings for movies that depict tobacco use

July 21, 2017
Public health experts have an unusual suggestion for reducing teen smoking: Give just about any movie that depicts tobacco use an automatic R rating.

Why sugary drinks and protein-rich meals don't go well together

July 20, 2017
Having a sugar-sweetened drink with a high-protein meal may negatively affect energy balance, alter food preferences and cause the body to store more fat, according to a study published in the open access journal BMC Nutrition.

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.