Majority of biggest U.S. cities now smoke-free

November 15, 2012
Majority of biggest U.S. cities now smoke-free
Almost half of Americans protected from secondhand smoke, compared with 3 percent in 2000, CDC says.

(HealthDay)—Thirty of the 50 largest cities in the United States are now smoke-free, a new report shows.

The 60 percent of large cities that are smoke-free have laws that prohibit in all indoor areas of private workplaces, restaurants and bars. In late 2000, only one of the 50 largest U.S. cities—San Jose, Calif.—had such a comprehensive smoke-free law.

As of Oct. 5, 2012, 16 of the 50 largest cities were covered by local smoke-free laws, and 14 more were covered by state smoke-free laws, according to the U.S. researchers.

Currently, nearly half of Americans are protected by state or local smoke-free laws, compared with less than 3 percent in 2000, the researchers said. New local smoke-free laws continue to be implemented in a number of cities and counties, but states are moving more slowly. Last week, North Dakota voters approved the first statewide smoke-free law adopted since 2010.

Research shows that smoke-free laws reduce exposure to secondhand smoke, reduce smoking, reduce heart attacks and improve health, according to the study in the Nov. 15 issue of the 's .

"Communities have made tremendous progress eliminating smoking from work sites and public places in 60 percent of big cities in the United States. Smoke-free laws save lives and don't hurt business," CDC Director Dr. Thomas Frieden, said in an agency news release.

"If we can protect workers and the public in the remaining 20 largest cities, 16 million people would be better protected from cancer and caused by secondhand smoke," he added.

Ten of the 20 largest cities without comprehensive smoke-free laws are in the South. In addition, 10 of those 20 cities are in states that prohibit local smoking restrictions from being stronger than or different from state law, the study found.

"Hundreds of cities and counties have passed their own smoke-free laws, including many communities in the South," Dr. Tim McAfee, director of CDC's Office on Smoking and Health, said in the news release. "If we continue to progress as we have since 2000, all Americans could be protected from exposure in workplaces and public places by 2020."

Explore further: Study finds smoke-free laws don't impact rural or urban economies

More information: The American Lung Association has more about secondhand smoke.

Related Stories

Study finds smoke-free laws don't impact rural or urban economies

August 2, 2011
In a recent study published in Nicotine and Tobacco Research, Ellen Hahn, professor in the University of Kentucky College of Nursing and Mark Pyles, assistant professor of finance in the School of Business at the College ...

Smoking bans reduce hospitalizations

October 29, 2012
(HealthDay)—Bans on smoking in public areas and workplaces have significantly reduced hospitalizations for heart attacks, strokes and asthma around the world, a new study finds.

Recommended for you

Marijuana use amongst youth stable, but substance abuse admissions up

August 15, 2017
While marijuana use amongst youth remains stable, youth admission to substance abuse treatment facilities has increased, according to new research from Binghamton University, State University of New York.

Report reveals underground US haven for heroin, drug users

August 8, 2017
A safe haven where drug users inject themselves with heroin and other drugs has been quietly operating in the United States for the past three years, a report reveals.

Regular energy drink use linked to later drug use among young adults

August 8, 2017
Could young adults who regularly consume highly caffeinated energy drinks be at risk for future substance use? A new study by University of Maryland School of Public Health researchers, published in the journal Drug and Alcohol ...

Gamblers more likely to have suffered childhood traumas, research shows

August 2, 2017
Men with problem and pathological gambling addictions are more likely to have suffered childhood traumas including physical abuse or witnessing violence in the home, according to new research.

Incorporating 12-step program elements improves youth substance-use disorder treatment

July 26, 2017
A treatment program for adolescents with substance-use disorder that incorporates the practices and philosophy of 12-step programs like Alcoholics Anonymous (AA) produced even better results than the current state-of-the ...

Concern with potential rise in super-potent cannabis concentrates

July 21, 2017
University of Queensland researchers are concerned the recent legalisation of medicinal cannabis in Australia may give rise to super-potent cannabis concentrates with associated harmful effects.

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.