Why older people struggle to read fine print

November 23, 2012, University of Leicester

(Medical Xpress)—Unique research into eye-movements of young and old people while reading discovers that word recognition patterns change as we grow older

Psychologists from the University of Leicester have carried out unique eye tests to examine reading styles in young and old people – and discovered for the first time that the way we read words changes as we grow older.

The team from the School of Psychology used an innovative method of digitally manipulating text combined with precise measures of readers' eye movements. This provides novel insights into how young and use different during reading.

Their results have been published in the journal Psychology and Aging.

The researchers conducted experiments that used very precise measures of readers' to assess how well they read lines of text that had been digitally manipulated to enhance the salience of different visual information. For instance, sometimes the text was blurred and other times the features of the individual letters were sharply defined.

The results showed that whereas young adults (18-30 years) found it easiest to read lines of text when the fine visual detail was present, this was more difficult for older adults (65+years), who found it easier to read more blurred text. These findings support the view that older adults use a different reading strategy from younger adults and that they rely more than young adults on holistic cues to the identities of words, such as word shape.

The research makes an important contribution to understanding why older people have difficulty in reading. The findings will promote further work to more fully understand this difficulty and already points to ways in which it can be combatted.

Dr Kevin Paterson, from the University of Leicester, said: "The findings showed that the difficulty older readers often experience is likely to be related to a progressive decline in visual sensitivity, particularly for visual detail, due to optical changes and changes in neural transmission even in individuals with apparently normal vision.

"However, the findings also showed that older readers comprehended text just as accurately as younger readers. Consequently, although normal aging clearly leads to important changes in reading behaviour, it seems that adaptive responses to the changing nature of the visual input may help older adults to read and understand text efficiently well into later life."

The research study aimed to understand how changes that take place in the eye and brain as a result of the normal aging process affect reading.

Dr Paterson said: "As we get older, we lose visual sensitivity, particularly to fine visual detail, due to changes in the eye and changes in neural transmission. This loss of is found even in individuals with apparently normal vision and is not corrected by optical aids, such as glasses or contact lenses. However, it is likely to have consequences for reading.

"The ability to read effectively is fundamental to participation in modern society, and the challenge age-related visual impairment presents to meeting everyday demands of living, working and citizenship is a matter of concern. The difficulty older adults have in reading is an important contributing factor to social exclusion. The RNIB has identified age-related reading difficulty amongst the over 65s as highly detrimental to quality of life and a barrier to employment.

"The fact that people have greater difficulty in reading as they get older limits their ability to engage in everyday activities (e.g., reading the newspaper, a utility bill, or the instructions on a medicine bottle), to continue to work, to read for leisure, to access education and knowledge, and to interact with others. Being able to understand the causes of this reading difficulty is an important first step to identifying ways to combat it.

"With an aging population and a rising retirement age, it is clear such problems pose serious economic and social challenges for the future. Consequently, research on this topic is likely to become increasingly important and both understanding and combatting age-related visual impairment will be important for reducing social exclusion in the elderly.

Explore further: Images on health websites can lessen comprehension, study finds

More information: Kevin B. Paterson, Victoria A. McGowan, Timothy R. Jordan
Filtered Text Reveals Adult Age Differences in Reading: Evidence From Eye Movements.
Psychology and Aging, Oct 15, 2012, No Pagination Specified. doi: 10.1037/a0030350

Related Stories

Images on health websites can lessen comprehension, study finds

August 28, 2012
(Medical Xpress)—Photos of happy, smiling faces on patient education websites may engage readers, but they also may have a negative impact on older adults' comprehension of vital health information, especially those elderly ...

Older Americans see better today, study finds

July 20, 2012
(HealthDay) -- Older Americans see better than their parents did in old age, according to a new study that finds visual impairment among the U.S. elderly has declined 58 percent since the 1980s.

Skilled readers rely on their brain's 'visual dictionary' to recognize words

November 14, 2011
Skilled readers can recognize words at lightning fast speed when they read because the word has been placed in a visual dictionary of sorts, say Georgetown University Medical Center (GUMC) neuroscientists. The visual dictionary ...

Debilitating eyesight problems are on the decline for older Americans

June 28, 2012
(Medical Xpress) -- Today’s senior citizens are reporting fewer visual impairment problems than their counterparts from a generation ago, according to a new Northwestern Medicine study. Improved techniques for cataract ...

Recommended for you

Intensive behavior therapy no better than conventional support in treating teenagers with antisocial behavior

January 19, 2018
Research led by UCL has found that intensive and costly multisystemic therapy is no better than conventional therapy in treating teenagers with moderate to severe antisocial behaviour.

Babies' babbling betters brains, language

January 18, 2018
Babies are adept at getting what they need - including an education. New research shows that babies organize mothers' verbal responses, which promotes more effective language instruction, and infant babbling is the key.

College branding makes beer more salient to underage students

January 18, 2018
In recent years, major beer companies have tried to capitalize on the salience of students' university affiliations, unveiling marketing campaigns and products—such as "fan cans," store displays, and billboard ads—that ...

Inherited IQ can increase in early childhood

January 18, 2018
When it comes to intelligence, environment and education matter – more than we think.

Modulating molecules: Study shows oxytocin helps the brain to modulate social signals

January 17, 2018
Between sights, sounds, smells and other senses, the brain is flooded with stimuli on a moment-to-moment basis. How can it sort through the flood of information to decide what is important and what can be relegated to the ...

Baby brains help infants figure it out before they try it out

January 17, 2018
Babies often amaze their parents when they seemingly learn new skills overnight—how to walk, for example. But their brains were probably prepping for those tasks long before their first steps occurred, according to researchers.

3 comments

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

Eikka
not rated yet Nov 23, 2012
The microsaccades of the eye get slower or stop alltogether in older people, which makes it difficult to see small detail for two reasons: because the retina stops responding to an image if it stays still for too long so staring at the text actually makes it more difficult to see, and the small movements of the eye help the brain discern more detail.

It's like trying to see outside through a tight mesh screen in the window - you can't see much until you start to move your head. People who have no microsaccades often automatically restort to shaking their heads to see better.
Sinister1811
1 / 5 (1) Nov 23, 2012
Keyword: Ageist.
Eikka
not rated yet Nov 23, 2012
Much of what counts as normal vision for us is actually overcoming the physical limitations of the actual "hardware" of the eye by tricks.

Microsaccades could be understood to be similiar to stacking images. If you take ten photographs of the same subject with a low resolution camera, the random shaking of the camera means that the pixel contents are slightly different between the pictures. When you stack the photographs it becomes possible to calculate sub-pixel size detail which is invisible in any one of the pictures, by observing how the pixel values change as the subject moves in the frame.

It also evens out the random noise and other imperfections in the picture by averaging - we don't see any noise or static even though it must be there - which is why the technique is also used by astrophotographers. A humble webcam attached to a telescope can yield astoundingly clear and sharp pictures when you stack couple hundred frames together.

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.