Pediatrician adoption of EHR systems lagging behind

November 19, 2012
Pediatrician adoption of EHR systems lagging behind
Pediatricians' adoption of fully functional electronic health record systems is lagging and fraught with financial and productivity concerns, according to a study published online Nov. 19 in Pediatrics.

(HealthDay)—Pediatricians' adoption of fully functional electronic health record (EHR) systems is lagging and fraught with financial and productivity concerns, according to a study published online Nov. 19 in Pediatrics.

Michael G. Leu, M.D., of the Seattle Children's Hospital, and colleagues surveyed 1,620 randomly selected members of the American Academy of Pediatrics to evaluate the use of EHRs and barriers to their adoption.

The researchers found that, of the 646 pediatric who responded, 54 percent reported using , and 41 percent used an EHR system. However, only 25 percent of these systems met the definition of a basic EHR and 6 percent met the definition of a fully functional EHR. Fewer still (3 percent) used a system that was both fully functional and pediatric-supportive. Those practicing in multispecialty or hospital-based practices were more likely to use an EHR compared with solo or two-. Primary barriers to implementation of EHRs included financial concerns for more than half, and, for more than one-third, concerns about whether these systems would meet their needs and concerns about how EHR implementation would affect their productivity.

"Pediatric adoption of fully functional EHRs lags general adoption. Barriers to adoption include financial and productivity concerns, but pediatricians are also concerned about finding systems that meet their needs," the authors write. "Few pediatricians use a system that is pediatric-supportive. To help identify pediatric-supportive systems, EHR certification efforts should include these requirements."

Explore further: Better together - The RN and the EHR

More information: Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Related Stories

Better together - The RN and the EHR

January 17, 2012
With the prodding of new federal legislation, electronic health records (EHRs) are rapidly becoming part of the daily practice of hospital nurses – the frontline providers of care. In the first large study of its kind, ...

Doctors who go digital provide higher quality healthcare

October 17, 2012
The use of electronic health records is linked to significantly higher quality care, according to a new study by Lisa Kern and her team, from the Health Information Technology Evaluation Collaborative in the US. Their work ...

Recommended for you

Phone-addicted teens are unhappy, study finds

January 22, 2018
Happiness is not a warm phone, according to a new study exploring the link between adolescent life satisfaction and screen time. Teens whose eyes are habitually glued to their smartphones are markedly unhappier, said study ...

Baby brains help infants figure it out before they try it out

January 17, 2018
Babies often amaze their parents when they seemingly learn new skills overnight—how to walk, for example. But their brains were probably prepping for those tasks long before their first steps occurred, according to researchers.

NeuroNext biomarker study explores natural history of infantile-onset SMA

January 9, 2018
Research led by The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center to define the natural history of infantile-onset spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) has been "critical" to accelerate the development of effective therapies and hasten ...

No link between childhood lead levels, later criminality

December 27, 2017
(HealthDay)— Exposure to higher levels of lead during early childhood can affect neurological development—but does that mean affected kids are doomed to delinquency?

Early puberty in girls may take mental health toll

December 26, 2017
(HealthDay)—A girl who gets her first menstrual period early in life—possibly as young as 7—has a greater risk for developing depression and antisocial behaviors that last at least into her 20s, a new study suggests.

Technology not taking over children's lives despite screen-time increase

December 21, 2017
With children spending increasing amounts of time on screen-based devices, there is a common perception that technology is taking over their lives, to the detriment and exclusion of other activities. However, new Oxford University ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.