Sustained release naltrexone effective, safe for opioid users

November 1, 2012
Sustained release naltrexone effective, safe for opioid users
Sustained release technologies for administering the opioid antagonist naltrexone seem to be effective with an acceptable adverse event profile, according to a review published online Oct. 22 in the British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology.

(HealthDay)—Sustained release technologies for administering the opioid antagonist naltrexone (SRX) seem to be effective with an acceptable adverse event profile, according to a review published online Oct. 22 in the British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology.

Nikolaj Kunøe, Ph.D., from the University of Oslo in Norway, and colleagues conducted a qualitative review of the literature to provide an overview of the currently available technologies for SRX and their effectiveness in reducing opioid use.

The researchers found that the most frequently studied SRX formulations have tolerable adverse event profiles and that most studies suggest that SRX is effective at decreasing heroin use. SRX may have a protective effect on mortality and morbidity, based on registry data. In some studies, other outcomes, including concomitant substance use, vocational training attendance, needle use, and risk behavior for blood-borne diseases (including HIV and hepatitis), were also affected by SRX.

"SRX is showing promising, consistent effects in supporting ' efforts to achieve abstinence across different clinical study design and treatment settings," the authors write. "The literature on SRX for opioid addiction still requires more studies in order to confirm initial findings on effects."

One author disclosed a financial tie to Go Medical Industries, which manufactures the Australian implant.

Explore further: Cardiac muscle really knows how to relax: Potential cardio-protective mechanism in heart

More information: Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Related Stories

Cardiac muscle really knows how to relax: Potential cardio-protective mechanism in heart

April 19, 2011
New insight into the physiology of cardiac muscle may lead to the development of therapeutic strategies that exploit an inherent protective state of the heart. The research, published by Cell Press online on April 19th in ...

Study sheds light on pain pill abuse

September 26, 2012
A study by a team of University of Kentucky researchers has shed new light on the potential habit-forming properties of the popular pain medication tramadol, in research funded by the National Institute on Drug Abuse. The ...

Polymorphism in opioid gene affects breast cancer survival

March 30, 2012
(HealthDay) -- Genotype at the A118G polymorphism of the µ-opioid receptor gene is associated with breast cancer-specific mortality, according to a study published in the April issue of Anesthesiology.

Recommended for you

In most surgery patients, length of opioid prescription, number of refills spell highest risk for misuse

January 17, 2018
The possible link between physicians' opioid prescription patterns and subsequent abuse has occupied the attention of a nation in the throes of an opioid crisis looking for ways to stem what experts have dubbed an epidemic. ...

Patients receive most opioids at the doctor's office, not the ER

January 16, 2018
Around the country, state legislatures and hospitals have tightened emergency room prescribing guidelines for opioids to curb the addiction epidemic, but a new USC study shows that approach diverts attention from the main ...

FDA bans use of opioid-containing cough meds by kids

January 12, 2018
(HealthDay)—Trying to put a dent in the ongoing opioid addiction crisis, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration on Thursday slapped strict new restrictions on the use of opioid-containing cold and cough products by kids.

Taking ibuprofen for long periods found to alter human testicular physiology

January 9, 2018
A team of researchers from Denmark and France has found that taking regular doses of the pain reliever ibuprofen over a long period of time can lead to a disorder in men called compensated hypogonadism. In their paper published ...

Nearly one-third of Canadians have used opioids: study

January 9, 2018
Nearly one in three Canadians (29 percent) have used "some form of opioids" in the past five years, according to data released Tuesday as widespread fentanyl overdoses continue to kill.

Growing opioid epidemic forcing more children into foster care

January 8, 2018
The opioid epidemic has become so severe it's considered a national public health emergency. Addiction to prescription painkillers, such as oxycodone and morphine, has contributed to a dramatic rise in overdose deaths and ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.