Predictors of organ damage identified in patients with SLE

December 16, 2012
Predictors of organ damage identified in patients with SLE
Patient age, hypertension, and corticosteroid use are the most important predictors of the cumulative organ damage that occurs in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus, according to research published in the December issue of Arthritis & Rheumatism.

(HealthDay)—Patient age, hypertension, and corticosteroid use are the most important predictors of the cumulative organ damage that occurs in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), according to research published in the December issue of Arthritis & Rheumatism.

Michelle Petri, M.D., M.P.H., of the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine in Baltimore, and colleagues used data from 2,054 patients with SLE in the Hopkins Cohort in an effort to identify predictors of organ damage, as assessed by the Systemic Lupus International Collaborating Clinics/American College of Rheumatology (ACR) Damage Index (SDI).

The researchers found that the rate of increase of the SDI score was 0.13 per year. African-American, male, or older patients as well as those with lower income or educational levels had higher rates of damage. Additionally, SLE patients with , proteinuria, or who were positive for lupus anticoagulant had increased rates of organ damage. During follow-up, those who were older, received corticosteroids, had more disease activity, satisfied more ACR criteria for SLE, had low complement levels, or who were positive for anti-double-stranded DNA had a higher risk of organ damage. Of these factors, age, hypertension, and corticosteroid use were the most important predictors of cumulative in SLE patients. Lower risk was seen for patients receiving hydroxychloroquine.

"Our findings indicate that rates of damage vary in demographic subgroups, but much variation appears to be explained by hypertension and use," the authors write. "These data clearly point to the need for tight control of disease activity without reliance on corticosteroids."

Explore further: The American College of Rheumatology issues guidelines for management of lupus nephritis

More information: Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Related Stories

The American College of Rheumatology issues guidelines for management of lupus nephritis

May 3, 2012
The American College of Rheumatology (ACR) has issued newly created guidelines for the screening, treatment, and management of lupus nephritis—a severe manifestation of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) where the disease ...

Statin therapy fails to slow progression of atherosclerosis in pediatric lupus patients

October 27, 2011
Atorvastatin therapy was found to be ineffective in reducing atherosclerosis progression in children and adolescents with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Results of the Atherosclerosis Prevention in Pediatric Lupus Erythematosus ...

Study shows the HPV vaccine Gardasil doesn't increase disease activity in SLE patients

May 26, 2011
Results of a Chinese study showed that the HPV vaccine did not have significant effects on the number of disease flares or antibody measures in patients with inactive SLE receiving stable doses of medications after administration, ...

Recommended for you

Treating arthritis with algae

August 23, 2017
Researchers at ETH Zurich, Empa and the Norwegian research institute SINTEF are pursuing a new approach to treating arthritis. This is based on a polysaccharide, a long-chain sugar molecule, originating from brown algae. ...

Study shows prevalence of knee osteoarthritis has doubled since World War II

August 14, 2017
The average American today is twice as likely to be diagnosed with knee osteoarthritis than in the years before World War II, Harvard scientists say, but that increase can't be blamed on the reasons most might think.

Researchers find arthritis drug could treat blood cancer patients

August 3, 2017
Blood cancer sufferers could be treated with a simple arthritis drug, scientists at the University of Sheffield have discovered.

Fluid in the knee holds clues for why osteoarthritis is more common in females

June 26, 2017
Researchers have more evidence that males and females are different, this time in the fluid that helps protect the cartilage in their knee joints.

Biologics before triple therapy not cost effective for rheumatoid arthritis

May 29, 2017
Stepping up to biologic therapy when methotrexate monotherapy fails offers minimal incremental benefit over using a combination of drugs known as triple therapy, yet incurs large costs for treating rheumatoid arthritis (RA). ...

Drug for refractory psoriatic arthritis shows promise in clinical trial

May 24, 2017
In a pivotal phase-3 clinical trial led by a Stanford University School of Medicine investigator, patients with psoriatic arthritis for whom standard-of-care pharmaceutical treatments have provided no lasting relief experienced ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.