Alternative med use common in pediatric specialty outpatients

January 14, 2013
Alternative med use common in pediatric specialty outpatients
Complementary and alternative medicine is commonly used among pediatric specialty outpatients, according to a study published online Jan. 14 in Pediatrics.

(HealthDay)—Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) is commonly used among pediatric specialty outpatients, according to a study published online Jan. 14 in Pediatrics.

Denise Adams, Ph.D., from the University of Alberta in Edmonton, Canada, and colleagues surveyed parents to examine the prevalence and patterns of CAM use in subspecialty clinics at one children's hospital in western Canada (Edmonton) and one in central Canada (Ottawa).

The researchers found that CAM use was significantly higher at the western hospital (71 percent) than the central hospital (42 percent), despite similar of the two populations. The majority of parents agreed or strongly agreed that they felt comfortable discussing use of CAM in their clinic. Multivitamins/minerals, herbal products, and were the most common currently used CAM products, while massage, chiropractic, relaxation, and aromatherapy were the most common currently used CAM practices. Participants reported 80 adverse effects with CAM, 55 of which were self-assessed as minor.

"CAM use is common in children," the authors write. "Parents would clearly like more information about CAM from their specialty clinics; such information would be easier to share if more primary data were available about the safety and effectiveness of commonly used therapies."

Explore further: Complementary medicine not tied to prostate cancer outcome

More information: Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Related Stories

Complementary medicine not tied to prostate cancer outcome

May 4, 2012
(HealthDay) -- Although widely used, complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) does not impact patient satisfaction with treatment or patient-reported outcomes after treatment for localized prostate cancer, according to ...

Alternative medicine doesn't affect asthma care in children

April 10, 2012
(HealthDay) -- Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) is not associated with adherence to pediatric asthma treatment, according to a study published online April 9 in Pediatrics.

Doctors, nurses often use holistic medicine for themselves

August 19, 2011
U.S. health care workers, especially doctors and nurses, use complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) far more than do workers in other fields, according to a new study. CAM includes diverse therapies outside the realm ...

Recommended for you

Small drop in measles vaccinations would have outsized effect, study estimates

July 24, 2017
Small reductions in childhood measles vaccinations in the United States would produce disproportionately large increases in the number of measles cases and in related public health costs, according to a new study by researchers ...

At the cellular level, a child's loss of a father is associated with increased stress

July 18, 2017
The absence of a father—due to incarceration, death, separation or divorce—has adverse physical and behavioral consequences for a growing child. But little is known about the biological processes that underlie this link ...

New comparison chart sheds light on babies' tears

July 10, 2017
A chart that enables parents and clinicians to calculate if a baby is crying more than it should in the first three months of its life has been created by a Kingston University London researcher, following a study of colic ...

Blood of SIDS infants contains high levels of serotonin

July 3, 2017
Blood samples from infants who died of Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS) had high levels of serotonin, a chemical that carries signals along and between nerves, according to a study funded in part by the National Institutes ...

Is your child's 'penicillin allergy' real?

July 3, 2017
(HealthDay)—Many children suspected of being allergic to the inexpensive, first-line antibiotic penicillin actually aren't, new research indicates.

Probiotic supplements failed to prevent babies' infections

July 3, 2017
(HealthDay)—Probiotic supplements may not protect babies from catching colds or stomach bugs in day care, a new clinical trial suggests.

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.