Functional MRI can improve prediction of CBT success

January 4, 2013
Functional MRI can improve prediction of CBT success
Results of functional brain imaging can greatly improve prediction of which patients with social anxiety disorder will benefit from cognitive behavioral therapy, according to a study published in the January issue of JAMA Psychiatry.

(HealthDay)—Results of functional brain imaging can greatly improve prediction of which patients with social anxiety disorder (SAD) will benefit from cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT), according to a study published in the January issue of JAMA Psychiatry.

Oliver Doehrmann, Ph.D., from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Cambridge, and colleagues examined brain responses to angry versus neutral faces or emotional versus neutral scenes using (MRI). This functional MRI data was collected prior to a CBT intervention to predict subsequent response to treatment in 39 medication-free patients meeting , Fourth Edition criteria for the generalized subtype of SAD. Changes in the Liebowitz Social Anxiety Scale score were measured to assess treatment outcome.

The researchers found that pretreatment responses significantly predicted the subsequent treatment outcome of patients selectively for social stimuli and particularly in regions of higher-order visual cortex. Clinical severity measures combined with the brain measures accounted for more than 40 percent of the variance in treatment response. Using brain measures greatly exceeded predictions based on clinical measures alone at baseline. Potential confounding factors such as depression severity at baseline did not affect prediction success.

"The results suggest that brain imaging can provide biomarkers that substantially improve predictions for the success of cognitive behavioral interventions and more generally suggest that such biomarkers may offer evidence-based, personalized medicine approaches for optimally selecting among treatment options for a patient," the authors write.

Several authors disclosed financial ties to the pharmaceutical industry.

Explore further: Brain scans could help doctors choose treatments for people with social anxiety disorder

More information: Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Related Stories

Brain scans could help doctors choose treatments for people with social anxiety disorder

September 6, 2012
A new study led by MIT neuroscientists has found that brain scans of patients with social anxiety disorder can help predict whether they will benefit from cognitive behavioral therapy.

Can new diagnostic approaches help assess brain function in unconscious, brain-injured patients?

May 9, 2012
Disorders of consciousness such as coma or a vegetative state caused by severe brain injury are poorly understood and their diagnosis has relied mainly on patient responses and measures of brain activity. However, new functional ...

Recommended for you

Intensive behavior therapy no better than conventional support in treating teenagers with antisocial behavior

January 19, 2018
Research led by UCL has found that intensive and costly multisystemic therapy is no better than conventional therapy in treating teenagers with moderate to severe antisocial behaviour.

Babies' babbling betters brains, language

January 18, 2018
Babies are adept at getting what they need - including an education. New research shows that babies organize mothers' verbal responses, which promotes more effective language instruction, and infant babbling is the key.

College branding makes beer more salient to underage students

January 18, 2018
In recent years, major beer companies have tried to capitalize on the salience of students' university affiliations, unveiling marketing campaigns and products—such as "fan cans," store displays, and billboard ads—that ...

Inherited IQ can increase in early childhood

January 18, 2018
When it comes to intelligence, environment and education matter – more than we think.

Modulating molecules: Study shows oxytocin helps the brain to modulate social signals

January 17, 2018
Between sights, sounds, smells and other senses, the brain is flooded with stimuli on a moment-to-moment basis. How can it sort through the flood of information to decide what is important and what can be relegated to the ...

Baby brains help infants figure it out before they try it out

January 17, 2018
Babies often amaze their parents when they seemingly learn new skills overnight—how to walk, for example. But their brains were probably prepping for those tasks long before their first steps occurred, according to researchers.

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.