High unawareness of distal sensorimotor polyneuropathy

January 10, 2013
High unawareness of distal sensorimotor polyneuropathy
A high percentage of older adults with diabetes and prediabetes are unaware of having clinical distal sensorimotor polyneuropathy, according to a study published online Dec. 28 in Diabetes Care.

(HealthDay)—A high percentage of older adults with diabetes and prediabetes are unaware of having clinical distal sensorimotor polyneuropathy (DSPN), according to a study published online Dec. 28 in Diabetes Care.

Brenda W.C. Bongaerts, Ph.D., from the Heinrich Heine University Düsseldorf in Germany, and colleagues assessed the prevalence of DSPN among 1,100 participants (aged 61 to 82 years old) from a population-based cohort study who underwent testing. The presence of bilaterally impaired foot-vibration perception and/or bilaterally impaired foot-pressure sensation was used to define clinical DSPN.

The researchers found that 154 participants (14 percent) had prevalent clinical DSPN, 140 of whom were unaware of their disorder. Participants with combined impaired fasting glucose and impaired glucose tolerance had the highest prevalence of DSPN (23.9 percent prevalence, with 10 of 11 unaware of their condition). DSPN was equally highly prevalent in participants with known diabetes (22.0 percent prevalence; 77 percent unaware of their condition). Eighteen of 25 (72 percent) clinical case subjects with known diabetes who reported having their feet examined by a physician were unaware of having DSPN.

"In conclusion, our findings show a high prevalence of unawareness of having clinical DSPN among subjects with and with diabetes," the authors write. "Overall, these results suggest inadequate attention to diabetic foot prevention practice and insufficient adherence to the clinical guidelines for necessary to prevent further development of severe diabetic foot complications."

Explore further: Diabetic polyneuropathy not up with impaired glycemia

More information: Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Related Stories

Diabetic polyneuropathy not up with impaired glycemia

March 3, 2012
(HealthDay) -- Although significantly increased in subjects with new diabetes, the rates of typical diabetic polyneuropathy (DPN), retinopathy, and nephropathy are not significantly different between subjects with and without ...

Prediabetes may not explain diabetic polyneuropathies

February 22, 2012
In a reversal of two decades of medical reports, a Mayo Clinic study finds the frequency of nerve damage called diabetic polyneuropathy is similar in prediabetic patients and healthy people. Physicians should seek explanations ...

Diabetic patients have higher prevalence of hearing impairment

November 14, 2012
Patients with diabetes have a significantly higher prevalence of hearing impairment than patients without diabetes, according to a recent study accepted for publication in The Endocrine Society's Journal of Clinical Endocrinology ...

Correlates of diabetic foot complications identified

July 8, 2012
(HealthDay) -- For patients with diabetes, increased poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR) immunoreactivity, reduced abundance of type 1 procollagen, and impaired skin structure correlate with foot complications, according to a study published ...

HbA1c less than 6.5 percent is specific, not sensitive for T1DM

September 2, 2012
(HealthDay)—Using a glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) threshold of ≥6.5 percent is a specific but not sensitive early indicator of type 1 diabetes (T1D) in high-risk children and young adults, according to a study published ...

Recommended for you

Genetic discovery may help better identify children at risk for type 1 diabetes

January 17, 2018
Six novel chromosomal regions identified by scientists leading a large, prospective study of children at risk for type 1 diabetes will enable the discovery of more genes that cause the disease and more targets for treating ...

Women who have gestational diabetes in pregnancy are at higher risk of future health issues

January 16, 2018
Women who have gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) during pregnancy have a higher than usual risk of developing type 2 diabetes, hypertension, and ischemic heart disease in the future, according to new research led by the ...

Diabetes gene found that causes low and high blood sugar levels in the same family

January 15, 2018
A study of families with rare blood sugar conditions has revealed a new gene thought to be critical in the regulation of insulin, the key hormone in diabetes.

Discovery could lead to new therapies for diabetics

January 12, 2018
New research by MDI Biological Laboratory scientist Sandra Rieger, Ph.D., and her team has demonstrated that an enzyme she had previously identified as playing a role in peripheral neuropathy induced by cancer chemotherapy ...

Enzyme shown to regulate inflammation and metabolism in fat tissue

January 11, 2018
The human body has two primary kinds of fat—white fat, which stores excess calories and is associated with obesity, and brown fat, which burns calories in order to produce heat and has garnered interest as a potential means ...

Big strides made in diabetes care

January 5, 2018
(HealthDay)—This past year was a busy, productive one for diabetes research and care.

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.