Back pain intensity most influential in fusion decision

January 24, 2013
Back pain intensity most influential in fusion decision
Patients seeing a spine surgeon are most influenced by low back pain intensity when considering whether to proceed with spinal fusion surgery, according to a study published in the Jan. 15 issue of Spine.

(HealthDay)—Patients seeing a spine surgeon are most influenced by low back pain intensity when considering whether to proceed with spinal fusion surgery, according to a study published in the Jan. 15 issue of Spine.

Christopher M. Bono, M.D., from Harvard Medical School in Boston, and colleagues surveyed 118 patients who were being seen for the first time by a spine surgeon for treatment of a non-traumatic or non-neoplastic spinal disorder. The questionnaire asked whether patients would consent to a fusion for low back pain under various scenarios presenting the risk of complications and the probability of symptom relief.

The researchers found that subjects accepted a mean of 10.2 of 24 scenarios presented, more often accepting in cases of lower risk and higher efficacy. After adjustment for a number of variables, a willingness to have surgery was significantly associated with low back , a history of spinal injections, and being white.

"The current investigation indicates that the intensity of is the most influential factor affecting a patient's decision to accept risk of complication and symptom persistence when considering lumbar fusion," Bono and colleagues conclude. "These data could potentially change the manner in which patients are counseled to make informed choices about spinal surgery."

Explore further: Study: One-fifth of spine surgery patients develop PTSD symptoms

More information: Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Related Stories

Study: One-fifth of spine surgery patients develop PTSD symptoms

September 28, 2012
Nearly 20 percent of people who underwent low back fusion surgery developed post-traumatic stress disorder symptoms associated with that surgery, according to a recent Oregon Health & Science University study published in ...

Spinal fusion surgery not associated with stroke

December 10, 2012
(HealthDay)—Undergoing spinal fusion surgery does not affect the risk of stroke within the three years after surgery, according to a study published in the December issue of the European Spine Journal.

Tests don't predict outcome after spine fusion for back pain

November 15, 2012
(HealthDay)—Currently, there is no test available to reliably predict which patients with chronic low back pain (LBP) will achieve a good clinical outcome after spinal fusion surgery, according to the results of a literature ...

Surgeon experience affects complication rate of spinal stenosis surgery

June 7, 2012
For patients undergoing surgery for spinal stenosis, the risk of complications is higher when the surgeon performs very few such procedures—less than four per year, suggests a study in the June issue of Neurosurgery, ...

No increased risk of stroke after spinal fusion surgery

August 9, 2012
(HealthDay) -- In the three years following spinal fusion surgery, the incidence of stroke is similar to or insignificantly lower than that of controls, according to a study published in the June issue of The Spine Journal.

Morbid obesity ups complication rate in spinal fusion surgery

June 5, 2012
(HealthDay) -- Morbid obesity increases the risk of multiple complications in spinal fusion surgery, particularly in patients undergoing anterior cervical or posterior lumbar procedures, according to research published in ...

Recommended for you

Creation of synthetic horsepox virus could lead to more effective smallpox vaccine

January 19, 2018
UAlberta researchers created a new synthetic virus that could lead to the development of a more effective vaccine against smallpox. The discovery demonstrates how techniques based on the use of synthetic DNA can be used to ...

Study ends debate over role of steroids in treating septic shock

January 19, 2018
The results from the largest ever study of septic shock could improve treatment for critically ill patients and save health systems worldwide hundreds of millions of dollars each year.

New approach could help curtail hospitalizations due to influenza infection

January 18, 2018
More than 700,000 Americans were hospitalized due to illnesses associated with the seasonal flu during the 2014-15 flu season, according to federal estimates. A radical new approach to vaccine development at UCLA may help ...

Zika virus damages placenta, which may explain malformed babies

January 18, 2018
Though the Zika virus is widely known for a recent outbreak that caused children to be born with microencephaly, or having a small head, and other malformations, scientists have struggled to explain how the virus affects ...

Certain flu virus mutations may compensate for fitness costs of other mutations

January 18, 2018
Seasonal flu viruses continually undergo mutations that help them evade the human immune system, but some of these mutations can reduce a virus's potency. According to new research published in PLOS Pathogens, certain mutations ...

Study reveals how MRSA infection compromises lymphatic function

January 17, 2018
Infections of the skin or other soft tissues with the hard-to-treat MRSA (methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus) bacteria appear to permanently compromise the lymphatic system, which is crucial to immune system function. ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.