Severe abuse at home linked to dating violence

January 22, 2013

Young urban black women who are exposed to severe abuse within their families are much more likely to be victims of dating violence, according to a study led by a Michigan State University researcher.

Angie Kennedy said efforts to prevent should include discussion of what might be going on in the victim's home.

"There is a lot of focus on trying to prevent dating violence for , which is an important goal," said Kennedy, MSU associate professor of social work. "But if you're sitting in a group talking about conflict with your dating partner and meanwhile have all these things going on within your family and no one's addressing it, that's a problem."

Youths exposed to violence in their families may begin to understand it as a normal part of life, according to the study, which appears in the research journal .

Kennedy and colleagues surveyed 180 female high school students in a poor Chicago community and found that:

  • 85 percent of them witnessed in their homes, with nearly half (49 percent) reporting an adult with an injury related to the abuse
  • 72 percent were physically abused themselves
  • 29 percent were sexually abused.
Dating violence was strongly associated with experiencing severe levels of these forms of family abuse, the study found.

Extreme also was linked to exposure to prostitution, albeit it on a limited scale. That exposure mostly involved the participants being asked if they wanted to exchange sex for money, not actively engaging in prostitution, Kennedy said.

Explore further: Know a teen hurt by a date? Someone else has been hurting them too, research finds

Related Stories

Know a teen hurt by a date? Someone else has been hurting them too, research finds

February 13, 2012
Teen victims of dating violence are overwhelmingly more likely to have been victims of other forms of violence, such as sexual violence and child abuse, according to new research from the University of New Hampshire Crimes ...

U.S. high schools lax in preventing dating abuse: study

July 9, 2012
(HealthDay) -- Although dating violence is a recognized problem for U.S. teens, a majority of high school counselors say their school provides no training or guidelines for dealing with abusive romantic relationships, a ...

Recommended for you

Brain disease seen in most football players in large report

July 25, 2017
Research on 202 former football players found evidence of a brain disease linked to repeated head blows in nearly all of them, from athletes in the National Football League, college and even high school.

Safety of medical devices not often evaluated by sex, age, or race

July 25, 2017
Researchers at Yale and the University of California-San Francisco have found that few medical devices are analyzed to consider the influence of their users' sex, age, or race on safety and effectiveness.

Why you should consider more than looks when choosing a fitness tracker

July 25, 2017
A UNSW study of five popular physical activity monitors, including Fitbit and Jawbone models, has found their accuracy differs with the speed of activity, and where they are worn.

Dog walking could be key to ensuring activity in later life

July 24, 2017
A new study has shown that regularly walking a dog boosts levels of physical activity in older people, especially during the winter.

Alcohol to claim 63,000 lives over next five years, experts warn

July 24, 2017
Alcohol consumption will cause 63,000 deaths in England over the next five years – the equivalent of 35 deaths a day – according to a new report from the University of Sheffield Alcohol Research Group.

Alcohol boosts recall of earlier learning

July 24, 2017
Drinking alcohol improves memory for information learned before the drinking episode began, new research suggests.

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.