Report details flaws in Army's handling of PTSD

March 8, 2013 by Gene Johnson

(AP)—The Army has more than doubled its number of military and civilian behavioral health workers in the past five years, but a new report says a litany of shortcomings plagues the force when it comes to diagnosing and treating soldiers for post-traumatic stress disorder.

The report being released Friday says confusing paperwork, inconsistent training and guidelines, and incompatible data systems have hindered the service as it tries to deal with behavioral health issues.

Last May, the Army commissioned a task force to review how it evaluates soldiers for .

The review came under pressure from Democratic Sen. Patty Murray, of Washington, who was upset to learn that hundreds of soldiers at Madigan Army Medical Center south of Seattle had their PTSD diagnoses reversed by a team.

Explore further: Letters from home may help prevent post-traumatic stress disorder in happily married soldiers

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