Higher activity levels may protect children from stress

March 29, 2013
Higher activity levels may protect children from stress
Children with lower levels of daytime physical activity (PA) have higher hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical axis activity in response to psychosocial stress, suggesting that PA may help children cope with stressful situations, according to research published online March 7 in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism.

(HealthDay)—Children with lower levels of daytime physical activity (PA) have higher hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical axis (HPAA) activity in response to psychosocial stress, suggesting that PA may help children cope with stressful situations, according to research published online March 7 in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism.

Silja Martikainen, of the University of Helsinki, and colleagues conducted a cross-sectional study of 258 8-year-old children to evaluate whether PA levels affected HPAA activity and HPAA response to psychosocial stress. PA was measured using a wrist accelerometer. Stressors included doing arithmetic and being assigned to tell a story.

The researchers found that, after exposure to everyday stressors, children with the highest levels of PA or vigorous PA showed very little, if any, increase in salivary cortisol levels when compared to more sedentary children in the lowest and intermediate PA groups.

"Our study shows that increased levels of PA are associated with decreased HPAA reactivity to stress in a community sample of 8-year-old children," the authors write. "Although children with different levels of PA show similar diurnal patterns of salivary cortisol, the children with the lowest activity levels are more responsive to psychosocial stress. Consequently, PA may contribute to the psychological well-being of by regulating their neuroendocrine reactivity to ."

Explore further: Exercise shields children from stress

More information: Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Related Stories

Exercise shields children from stress

March 7, 2013
Exercise may play a key role in helping children cope with stressful situations, according to a recent study accepted for publication in The Endocrine Society's Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism (JCEM).

Vigorous physical activity associated with reduced cardiometabolic risk factors in youth

September 10, 2012
A study of Canadian youth suggests that vigorous physical activity was associated with reduced cardiometabolic risk factors, such as body mass index z score (BMI-z), waist circumference, systolic blood pressure and increased ...

Measures for parental influence on physical activity lacking

August 8, 2012
(HealthDay) -- Accepted measures to address the role of parental influence on child physical activity (PA) are lacking, with current studies characterized by variation in conceptualization and measurement of parenting, use ...

Dietary PA/OA fat ratio may affect T2DM risk in women only

December 28, 2012
(HealthDay)—A diet low in palmitic acid (PA) and high in oleic acid (OA) improves insulin sensitivity and is associated with lower levels of markers of metabolic and oxidative stress in women only, according to a study ...

Pathological aging brains contain the same amyloid plaques as Alzheimer's disease

May 23, 2012
Pathological aging (PA) is used to describe the brains of people which have Alzheimer's disease (AD)-like pathology but where the person showed no signs of cognitive impairment whilst they were alive. New research, published ...

Mom or dad has bipolar disorder? Keep stress in check

May 5, 2011
Children whose mother or father is affected by bipolar disorder may need to keep their stress levels in check. A new international study, led by Concordia University, suggests the stress hormone cortisol is a key player in ...

Recommended for you

Brain disease seen in most football players in large report

July 25, 2017
Research on 202 former football players found evidence of a brain disease linked to repeated head blows in nearly all of them, from athletes in the National Football League, college and even high school.

Safety of medical devices not often evaluated by sex, age, or race

July 25, 2017
Researchers at Yale and the University of California-San Francisco have found that few medical devices are analyzed to consider the influence of their users' sex, age, or race on safety and effectiveness.

Why you should consider more than looks when choosing a fitness tracker

July 25, 2017
A UNSW study of five popular physical activity monitors, including Fitbit and Jawbone models, has found their accuracy differs with the speed of activity, and where they are worn.

Dog walking could be key to ensuring activity in later life

July 24, 2017
A new study has shown that regularly walking a dog boosts levels of physical activity in older people, especially during the winter.

Alcohol to claim 63,000 lives over next five years, experts warn

July 24, 2017
Alcohol consumption will cause 63,000 deaths in England over the next five years – the equivalent of 35 deaths a day – according to a new report from the University of Sheffield Alcohol Research Group.

Alcohol boosts recall of earlier learning

July 24, 2017
Drinking alcohol improves memory for information learned before the drinking episode began, new research suggests.

1 comment

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

Argiod
3 / 5 (4) Mar 29, 2013
It works well with adults, too.
Keep our minds off the BS going on in the world by keeping us busy chasing money, toys, pleasure, etc. As long as we're concentrating on keeping our heads above water and pursuing the pleasures that make our lives worth living; we won't have time to think about all the nasty crap governments and big corporations are heaping upon us.

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.