Food poisonings up from raw milk, poultry bacteria

April 18, 2013 by Mike Stobbe

(AP)—Health officials are seeing more food poisonings caused by a bacteria commonly linked to raw milk and poultry.

A study released Thursday said campylobacter (camp-eh-lo-BACK'-ter) cases grew by 14 percent over the last five years.

The report was based on foodborne infections in only 10 states—about 15 percent of the . But it is seen as a good indicator of food poisoning trends.

Overall, food poisonings held fairly steady in recent years. There were no significant jumps in cases from most other food bugs, including salmonella and E. coli. But campylobacter rose, and last year accounted for more than a third of food poisoning illnesses in those states and about a 10th of the deaths.

Explore further: Study says leafy greens top food poisoning source

More information: CDC report: www.cdc.gov/mmwr

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rawmilkmike
not rated yet May 12, 2013
This is what the CDC
passes off as an out break of
foodborne illness:

1. Illness; diarrhea and not cancer, heart disease, osteoporosis, lactose intolerance etc. Aren't these what the public would naturally assume the state is referring to.

2. Food; only agricultural commodities and not canned food, cakes, cookies, candy, soda, chocolate milk etc. Again, not what the public would natural assume.

3. Outbreak; 73 cases in 3 months, while the nearly 300 million other cases of diarrhea in this country are not even acknowledged.

4. Association; cucumbers, because 67% of the 45 ill interviewed ate cucumbers while only 44% of the well people surveyed ate cucumbers and not because of any actual Salmonella contamination found.

5. Blame; 2 Mexican producers because 6 of the 45 ill interviewed eat their cucumbers and not because of any actual Salmonella contamination found.

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