Protect your kids from pollen allergies: expert

April 28, 2013
Protect your kids from pollen allergies: expert
Tips for keeping allergens away from their skin, out of air in your home.

(HealthDay)—Many children suffer allergies at this time of year as trees and other plants start releasing pollens into the air. So parents need to monitor their youngsters for symptoms, an expert says.

"There are different types of allergies, but if you notice that your child has more symptoms and reactions during the spring it's a clue that they have a pollen allergy," Dr. Joyce Rabbat, a pediatric allergist at Loyola University Chicago Stritch School of Medicine, said in a Loyola news release.

Symptoms of pollen allergies—which are most likely to be worse on dry, windy days—include itchy eyes, sneezing, stuffy/runny nose, coughing and asthma.

"If your child's allergy symptoms are interfering with his or her daily life, there is no reason to let the child suffer. Allergy symptoms are very treatable. Some people think it's just something they need to 'live with' but that's not the case," Rabbat said.

She said parents can take the following steps to help reduce children's allergy symptoms:

  • Check and limit children's time outside when the counts are high.
  • Keep windows and doors closed, especially on high-count days. This will help limit the amount of pollen that lands on furniture and carpets. Turn on your air conditioner to filter pollen from the air within your house.
  • Have children wash their face and hands when they come in from outdoors. A shower and change of clothes can take off the body.

"If your child is active outdoors or in sports, make sure he or she takes allergy medication before heading outside," Rabbat said.

Parents also need to watch for because many children with allergies also have allergic asthma. Symptoms of allergic asthma include coughing, shortness of breath, , wheezing and a feeling of tightness in the chest.

"Often treating children's allergies helps to control their asthma as well. Kids may need to take an allergy medicine before going outside, or they may need daily medication. It's also important to get ahead of your . Once allergies are flaring, they become more difficult to treat. If you are on a good medication regimen before the pollens peak, it makes for a much more enjoyable season," Rabbat said.

Explore further: Does your child have seasonal allergies or a cold?

More information: The Nemours Foundation has more about seasonal allergies in children.

Related Stories

Does your child have seasonal allergies or a cold?

May 15, 2012
(HealthDay) -- It can be difficult during the spring months for parents to determine whether their children have a cold or seasonal allergies, but an expert outlines how to tell the difference.

Nip springtime allergies in the bud

March 17, 2013
(HealthDay)—The spring allergy season is off to an early start and allergy sufferers need to take action to prevent symptoms, an expert says.

Tips for managing your child's allergies

March 19, 2012
(Medical Xpress) -- Allergy season can be a difficult time of year for many children and their parents.  With spring in the air, pollen is close behind.

Hurricane Isaac could stir up allergies, asthma

August 29, 2012
(HealthDay)—Dangerous winds and flooding aren't the only hazards posed by Hurricane Isaac as it pounds Louisiana and Mississippi.

Winter weather plays a role in spring allergies, expert says

March 3, 2013
(HealthDay)—The start of allergy season is overlapping with the cold and flu season in some parts of the United States, leading some people to wonder which ailment they have, an expert says.

Recommended for you

Immune cells may be key to better allergy, infection therapies

July 28, 2017
By learning how a recently discovered immune cell works in the body, researchers hope to one day harness the cells to better treat allergies and infections, according to new Cornell research.

Team finds link between backup immune defense, mutation seen in Crohn's disease

July 27, 2017
Genes that regulate a cellular recycling system called autophagy are commonly mutated in Crohn's disease patients, though the link between biological housekeeping and inflammatory bowel disease remained a mystery. Now, researchers ...

Co-infection with two common gut pathogens worsens malnutrition in mice

July 27, 2017
Two gut pathogens commonly found in malnourished children combine to worsen malnutrition and impair growth in laboratory mice, according to new research published in PLOS Pathogens.

Study sheds light on how body may detect early signs of cancer

July 26, 2017
Fresh insights into how cells detect damage to their DNA - a hallmark of cancer - could help explain how the body keeps disease in check.

How genetically engineered viruses develop into effective vaccines

July 26, 2017
Lentiviral vectors are virus particles that can be used as a vaccine to stimulate the immune system to fight against specific pathogens. The vectors are derived from HIV, rendered non-pathogenic, and then engineered to carry ...

Accounting for human immune diversity increases clinical relevance of fundamental immunological research

July 26, 2017
Mouse models have advanced our understanding of immune function and disease in many ways but they have failed to account for the natural diversity in human immune responses. As a result, insights gained in the lab may be ...

1 comment

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

gwrede
1 / 5 (1) Apr 28, 2013
This article has no place on a scientific site.

The content level is merely that of a ladies' journal.

I severely disapprove of this quantity over quality attitude at MedicalExpress.

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.