Lumbar disc herniation surgery is effective for octogenarians

April 8, 2013
Lumbar disc herniation surgery is effective for octogenarians
For octogenarian patients with lumbar disc herniation, unilateral laminectomy and discectomy seems safe and effective, according to a study published in the April issue of the Journal of Spinal Disorders & and Techniques.

(HealthDay)—For octogenarian patients with lumbar disc herniation, unilateral laminectomy and discectomy seems safe and effective, according to a study published in the April issue of the Journal of Spinal Disorders and Techniques.

Hai Nie, M.D., from the Affiliated Hospital of Chengdu University, Sichuan. China, and colleagues examined the efficacy and safety of lumbar disc herniation surgery for octogenarian patients. Participants included 64 patients (mean age, 83.7 years) who underwent unilateral laminectomy and discectomy. Outcomes were compared with a control group of 628 patients, aged 40 to 60 years (mean age, 49.8 years).

The researchers found that the length of hospital stay was significantly different for the very elderly and middle-aged patients. Operative time, intraoperative estimated blood loss, and complication rate were not significantly different between the groups. There were no significantly differences for very old and middle-aged patients with respect to preoperative, postoperative, and final follow-up visual analog scale (VAS) or (ODI) scores. After surgery and at final follow-up, the VAS and ODI scores were significantly improved compared with before surgery. The majority (89.1 percent) of octogenarian patients expressed satisfaction with outcome.

"Conventional laminectomy, discectomy, and/or in patients above 80 years is a feasible, safe, and effective treatment without significant morbidity, compared with middle-aged patients," the authors write. "There was long-lasting improvement and high after lumbar discectomy in the majority of the very elderly patients."

Explore further: Surgical treatment within six months of lumbar disc herniation

More information: Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Related Stories

Surgical treatment within six months of lumbar disc herniation

October 25, 2011
A new study in the Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery (JBJS) found that patients with herniated lumbar disc symptoms were significantly worse if the patients had symptoms for more than six months prior to treatment, compared ...

More complications for inpatient lumbar discectomy

February 4, 2013
(HealthDay)—Patients undergoing inpatient lumbar discectomy have significantly higher overall complication rates than those treated as outpatients, according to a study published in the Feb. 1 issue of Spine.

Oxiplex improves outcomes after lumbar discectomy

April 24, 2012
(HealthDay) -- The use of Oxiplex gel (containing carboxymethylcellulose, polyethylene oxide, and calcium) to coat the surgical site during discectomy procedures for the treatment of lumbar disc herniation is associated with ...

Disc disease severity doesn't predict surgical outcomes

November 9, 2012
(HealthDay)—Increasing severity of degenerative disc disease (DDD) does not impact outcomes in total lumbar disc replacement (TDR), according to a study published in the November issue of the European Spine Journal.

Improved driving reaction times after lumbar disc sx

January 15, 2013
(HealthDay)—Driving reaction times (DRTs), which are increased for patients with radiculopathy, improve after lumbar disc surgery, according to a study published in the November issue of the European Spine Journal.

Study finds poorer outcomes for obese patients treated for lumbar disc herniation

January 10, 2013
While obese patients are more likely to have surgical treatment for lumbar disc herniation – a slipped or ruptured disc – than nonobese patients, obesity increases operative time, blood loss and length of hospital stay, ...

Recommended for you

Drug may help surgical patients stop opioids sooner

December 13, 2017
(HealthDay)—Opioid painkillers after surgery can be the first step toward addiction for some patients. But a common drug might cut the amount of narcotics that patients need, a new study finds.

Children best placed to explain facts of surgery to patients, say experts

December 13, 2017
Getting children to design patient information leaflets may improve patient understanding before they have surgery, finds an article in the Christmas issue of The BMJ.

Burn victim saved by skin grafts from identical twin (Update)

November 23, 2017
A man doomed to die after suffering burns across 95 percent of his body was saved by skin transplants from his identical twin in a world-first operation, French doctors said Thursday.

Is a common shoulder surgery useless?

November 21, 2017
(HealthDay)—New research casts doubt on the true effectiveness of a common type of surgery used to ease shoulder pain.

Study shows electric bandages can fight biofilm infection, antimicrobial resistance

November 6, 2017
Researchers at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center have shown - for the first time - that special bandages using weak electric fields to disrupt bacterial biofilm infection can prevent infections, combat antibiotic ...

Obesity increases incidence, severity, costs of knee dislocations

November 3, 2017
A new study of more than 19,000 knee dislocation cases in the U.S. between 2000 and 2012 provides a painful indication of how the nation's obesity epidemic is changing the risk, severity and cost of a traumatic injury.

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.