Risk of new-onset diabetes varies with different statins

April 11, 2013
Risk of new-onset diabetes varies with different statins
Different types and doses of statins seem to correlate with distinct risks of developing new-onset diabetes mellitus, according to a meta-analysis published in the April 15 issue of The American Journal of Cardiology.

(HealthDay)—Different types and doses of statins seem to correlate with distinct risks of developing new-onset diabetes mellitus (DM), according to a meta-analysis published in the April 15 issue of The American Journal of Cardiology.

Eliano Pio Navarese, M.D., Ph.D., of Nicolaus Copernicus University in Poland, and colleagues conducted a network meta-analysis of 17 randomized, controlled trials involving 113,394 patients to examine the impact of different types and doses of statins on new-onset DM.

The researchers found that, in the comparison of statins versus , the lowest risk for new-onset DM was seen for plavastatin 40 mg/day (odds ratio, 1.07; 95 percent credible interval, 0.86 to 1.30). In contrast, 20 mg/day correlated with a greater risk of DM (odds ratio, 1.25; 95 percent credible interval, 0.82 to 1.90), while 80 mg/day exhibited intermediate risk (odds ratio, 1.15; 95 percent credible interval, 0.90 to 1.50). Similar findings were seen at moderate doses of statins.

"The findings of this large network meta-analysis are the first to provide information on the specific risk for DM associated with different types and doses of statins," the authors write. "If the findings of this network meta-analysis were confirmed in powered head-to-head comparisons, they would have important implications for the future management of millions of individuals receiving statins worldwide; indeed, a new scenario of statin therapy could be envisaged in which personalized statin therapy might emerge as the most effective and safest strategy."

Explore further: Statin use in postmenopausal women associated with increased diabetes risk

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