Positive effect of white button mushrooms when substituted for meat on body weight

April 22, 2013

New research published as an abstract in The FASEB Journal and presented at Experimental Biology 2013 (EB 2013) on Monday, April 22 ties mushrooms to positive health outcomes in the area of weight management. A one-year, randomized clinical trial conducted by researchers at the Weight Management Center at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health and funded by the Mushroom Council found that substituting white button mushrooms for red meat can be a useful strategy for enhancing and maintaining weight loss.1

Participants included (73 adults; 88% women; mean age 48.4 years) who were placed in an intervention group eating approximately one cup of mushrooms per day in place of meat, and a standard diet control group.

At the end of the one-year trial, researchers found that participants who substituted mushrooms for meat lost seven pounds, showed improvements in body composition compared to participants on the standard diet, and maintained the weight loss. Specifically, those in the intervention group reported lower calorie and fat intake (123 calories, 4.25 grams respectively, per day); lost more pounds and percentage body weight (7 pounds, 3.6 percent of their starting weight); achieved lower (1.5kg/m2), (2.6 inches) and percent total body fat (0.85 percent) compared to participants on the control diet.

The new findings build on previous research, which showed that increasing intake of low-energy-density foods, specifically mushrooms, in place of high-energy-density foods, like lean ground beef, can be an effective method for reducing daily energy and fat intake while still feeling full and satiated after the meal.2

Lawrence Cheskin, M.D., F.A.C.P., Associate Professor, Department of Health, Behavior and Society at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, authored the research study and can discuss the role of mushroom substitution in the area of weight management.

Research will be presented at the Body Composition Poster Session at the meeting of the American Society for Nutrition at 2013 on Monday, April 22, 1:45 pm-2:45 pm EST; Boston Convention & Exhibition Center, Boston, MA.

Explore further: Study finds diet plus exercise is more effective for weight loss than either method alone

More information: 1 Poddar K.H., Ames M., Chen H., et al., (2013) Positive effect of white button mushrooms when substituted for meat on body weight and composition changes during weight loss and weight maintenance – A one-year randomized clinical trial. FASEB J. 27, 852.4.

2 Cheskin L.J., Davis L.M., Lipsky L. M., et al., (2008) Lack of energy compensation over 4 days when white button mushrooms are substituted for beef. Appetite. 51, 50-57.

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