Severe cutaneous adverse rxns up in allopurinol initiators

April 23, 2013
Severe cutaneous adverse rxns up in allopurinol initiators
Allopurinol initiators have an almost 10-fold increased risk of severe cutaneous adverse reactions compared with nonusers, according to a study published in the April issue of Arthritis Care & Research.

(HealthDay)—Allopurinol initiators have an almost 10-fold increased risk of severe cutaneous adverse reactions (SCARs) compared with nonusers, according to a study published in the April issue of Arthritis Care & Research.

Seoyoung C. Kim, M.D., from Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston, and colleagues conducted a propensity-score matched cohort study using data from five large Medicaid programs to examine the incidence rate and in-hospital mortality of hospitalization for in allopurinol initiators compared with non-allopurinol users.

During 65,625 person-years of follow-up for allopurinol initiators, the researchers found that 45 patients were hospitalized for SCARs, with a crude incidence ratio of 0.69 per 1,000 person-years. All cases occurred within 365 of initiating treatment with allopurinol and 91.1 percent occurred within 180 days. During the hospitalization, 26.7 percent of patients died. For non-allopurinol users, the crude incidence rate was 0.04 per 1,000 person-years. For allopurinol initiators versus nonusers, the risk of SCARs was significantly increased (hazard ratio, 9.68). After adjustment for age, comorbidities, and recent diuretic use, the hazard ratio for high-dosage (>300 mg/day) versus low-dosage allopurinol was 1.30 for allopurinol users.

"Our study suggests that the risk of SCARs was 10 times as high in allopurinol initiators as compared to non-allopurinol users," the authors write. "Future studies using a large detailed clinical data set from a large prospective inception cohort of users is needed for a better understanding of other risk factors of SCARs such as impaired renal function and concomitant medication use."

Several authors disclosed financial ties to pharmaceutical companies, including Takeda, which partially funded the study.

Explore further: Gout drug offers hope for heart disease patients

More information: Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Related Stories

Gout drug offers hope for heart disease patients

March 5, 2013
(Medical Xpress)—Research at the University of Dundee has shown than an old, inexpensive anti-gout drug has benefits for heart disease sufferers and has the potential to one day help prevent heart disease, sudden deaths ...

Post-SES implantation, statins prevent late revascularization

May 12, 2012
(HealthDay) -- For patients who undergo sirolimus-eluting stent (SES) implantation, use of statin therapy is associated with a reduced risk of late target lesion revascularization (TLR), according to a study published in ...

Recommended for you

Prototype equipment can detect rheumatoid arthritis

September 28, 2017
According to a first clinical study published in the scientific journal Photoacoustics, the University of Twente and various European partners have designed a device that shows the difference between healthy fingers and arthritic ...

Improving the recognition of anxiety and depression in rheumatoid arthritis

August 28, 2017
A study conducted by Keele University shows that patients with rheumatoid arthritis who are also suffering with anxiety or depression may avoid talking to their GP about their mental health symptoms.

How you think about your arthritis makes a difference

August 24, 2017
(HealthDay)—How well you cope with knee arthritis depends a lot on your mental outlook, a new study suggests.

Treating arthritis with algae

August 23, 2017
Researchers at ETH Zurich, Empa and the Norwegian research institute SINTEF are pursuing a new approach to treating arthritis. This is based on a polysaccharide, a long-chain sugar molecule, originating from brown algae. ...

Study shows prevalence of knee osteoarthritis has doubled since World War II

August 14, 2017
The average American today is twice as likely to be diagnosed with knee osteoarthritis than in the years before World War II, Harvard scientists say, but that increase can't be blamed on the reasons most might think.

Researchers find arthritis drug could treat blood cancer patients

August 3, 2017
Blood cancer sufferers could be treated with a simple arthritis drug, scientists at the University of Sheffield have discovered.

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.