Facing the chill wind of blood pressure

May 22, 2013

(Medical Xpress)—High blood pressure is something that has traditionally been a problem in Scotland, but might there be a link to our climate?

A new study has found that some people's blood pressure is affected more by the and this blood pressure sensitivity to temperature may be a marker of early .

Sandosh Padmanabhan, Reader at the Institute of Cardiovascular and Medical Sciences at the University of Glasgow said: "This is a unique study as it shows that response to weather – and particularly temperature – can be reflected in blood pressure and is specific to the individual."

The study involved assessing over 169,000 blood pressure measurements in 16,010 patients who attended the Glasgow Blood Pressure Clinic between 1970 and 2011. Each patient's blood pressure measured at every clinic visit was mapped to prevailing in the area on that day and the response of blood pressure to weather determined.

The team found that on average the blood pressure of an individual drops 2% each year if weather is similar on the two visits. However, if the temperature between consecutive visits fell from the highest quartile to the lowest quartile, then the patients' blood pressure rose by 2.1%. The same was true for a reduction in sunshine, showing a 2.3% increase. Increases in air-frost and from the bottom to top quartiles were associated with 1.4% and 0.8% rises respectively in blood pressure. Patients differed in their response to weather, with temperature-sensitive patients showing worse during follow-up and a 35% increased risk of long-term mortality compared to the temperature non-sensitive patients.

Sandosh Padmanabhan said "This is the first study to show the effect of different weather parameters on blood pressure measurements. Knowing a patient's blood pressure response to weather can help reduce unnecessary antihypertensive treatment modification and identify temperature sensitive individuals who are at higher risk for further risk reduction measures."

Explore further: Test can identify patients with hypertension at higher risk of death

More information: hyper.ahajournals.org/content/ … A.111.00686.full.pdf

Related Stories

Test can identify patients with hypertension at higher risk of death

July 23, 2012
(Medical Xpress) -- An inexpensive and routinely performed blood test could help identify patients with high blood pressure who are at increased risk of dying from the condition.

Blood pressure changes warn of premature death for African Americans with kidney disease

March 14, 2013
Large fluctuations in blood pressure from day to day are a warning sign for African Americans with kidney disease, indicating that they may face an increased risk of dying prematurely. That is the conclusion of a study appearing ...

The effect of body mass index on blood pressure varies by race among children

September 21, 2012
Obesity in black children more severely impacts blood pressure than in white children who are equally overweight, according to a new study presented at the American Heart Association's High Blood Pressure Research 2012 Scientific ...

Yogurt consumption, blood pressure, and incident hypertension

September 19, 2012
Adding more yogurt to your diet without increasing the number of calories you eat may help lower your risk of high blood pressure, according to new research presented at the American Heart Association's High Blood Pressure ...

Free online program helps reduce blood pressure

March 5, 2013
People with high blood pressure enrolled in a clinical pharmacist-led web-based monitoring program were more likely to lower their pressure to recommended level than people who did not use the program.

Molecular hub links obesity, heart disease to high blood pressure

April 11, 2013
(Medical Xpress)—Obesity, heart disease, and high blood pressure (hypertension) are all related, but understanding the molecular pathways that underlie cause and effect is complicated.

Recommended for you

Aging Americans enjoy longer life, better health when avoiding three risky behaviors

July 20, 2017
We've heard it before from our doctors and other health experts: Keep your weight down, don't smoke and cut back on the alcohol if you want to live longer.

Parents have critical role in preventing teen drinking

July 20, 2017
Fewer teenagers are drinking alcohol but more needs to be done to curb the drinking habits of Australian school students, based on the findings of the latest study by Adelaide researchers.

Fresh fish oil lowers diabetes risk in rat offspring

July 19, 2017
Fresh fish oil given to overweight pregnant rats prevented their offspring from developing a major diabetes risk factor, Auckland researchers have found.

High-dose vitamin D doesn't appear to reduce the winter sniffles for children

July 18, 2017
Giving children high doses of vitamin D doesn't appear to reduce the winter sniffles, a new study has found.

Scientists develop new supplement that can repair, rejuvenate muscles in older adults

July 18, 2017
Whey protein supplements aren't just for gym buffs according to new research from McMaster university. When taken on a regular basis, a combination of these and other ingredients in a ready-to-drink formula have been found ...

Study: Eating at 'wrong time' affects body weight, circadian rhythms

July 18, 2017
A new high-precision feeding system for lab mice reinforces the idea that the time of day food is eaten is more critical to weight loss than the amount of calories ingested.

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.