Denmark warns against rice for children

May 15, 2013

Denmark's Veterinary and Food Administration said Wednesday that parents should stop giving their children rice cakes and rice milk, saying the products contained unacceptable levels of inorganic arsenic.

The food safety authority said inorganic arsenic, a known human carcinogen, is naturally found in rice.

"People who eat foods with inorganic arsenic every day have an increased risk of ," the authority said in a news release published on its website.

It added that parents should be "particularly careful" in relation to children due to their high intake relative to their body weight.

"Avoid rice drink and rice milk for children," the authority said in recommendations on rice products, adding that children should not be served rice-based hot every day.

It added that it had already begun new tests of other rice products to determine contents of inorganic arsenic, including products such as rice-based breakfast products and rice noodles. Analyses of these products were expected to be made public in July, the authority said.

In November 2012, US-based Consumerreports.org tested 200 different rice products finding both organic arsenic and "significant levels" of in almost all products. The organisation called for US federal standards to be introduced for arsenic in foodstuffs.

Explore further: Dietitian weighs in on controversy about arsenic in food: Eating a balanced diet will limit exposure to element

Related Stories

Dietitian weighs in on controversy about arsenic in food: Eating a balanced diet will limit exposure to element

November 15, 2012
(Medical Xpress)—Recent reports about arsenic in rice have sparked a great deal of panic among U.S. consumers. However, the average American who eats a variety of whole grains doesn't need to stress about arsenic, according ...

Genetically engineered rice: Protection from arsenic?

September 20, 2012
(Medical Xpress)—In an article this week, Consumer Reports is calling on the Food and Drug Administration to set standards for how much arsenic can be allowed in rice after finding the potential toxin in almost every rice ...

US urged to set standards for arsenic in rice

September 19, 2012
(AP)—The U.S. Food and Drug Administration may consider new standards for the levels of arsenic in rice as consumer groups are calling for federal guidance on how much of the carcinogen can be present in food.

Cooking tips to possibly lessen risk of arsenic in rice

October 8, 2012
Last month rice lovers got some bitter news. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration and Consumer Reports released studies showing "worrisome" levels of cancer-causing arsenic in many popular rices and rice products.

Recommended for you

Women run faster after taking newly developed supplement, study finds

January 19, 2018
A new study found that women who took a specially prepared blend of minerals and nutrients for a month saw their 3-mile run times drop by almost a minute.

Americans are getting more sleep

January 19, 2018
Although more than one in three Americans still don't get enough sleep, a new analysis shows first signs of success in the fight for more shut eye. According to data from 181,335 respondents aged 15 and older who participated ...

Wine is good for you—to a point

January 18, 2018
The Mediterranean diet has become synonymous with healthy eating, but there's one thing in it that stands out: It's cool to drink wine.

Sleep better, lose weight?

January 17, 2018
(HealthDay)—Sleeplessness could cost you when it's time to stand on your bathroom scale, a new British study suggests.

Who uses phone apps to track sleep habits? Mostly the healthy and wealthy in US

January 16, 2018
The profile of most Americans who use popular mobile phone apps that track sleep habits is that they are relatively affluent, claim to eat well, and say they are in good health, even if some of them tend to smoke.

Improvements in mortality rates are slowed by rise in obesity in the United States

January 15, 2018
With countless medical advances and efforts to curb smoking, one might expect that life expectancy in the United States would improve. Yet according to recent studies, there's been a reduction in the rate of improvement in ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.