Denmark warns against rice for children

May 15, 2013

Denmark's Veterinary and Food Administration said Wednesday that parents should stop giving their children rice cakes and rice milk, saying the products contained unacceptable levels of inorganic arsenic.

The food safety authority said inorganic arsenic, a known human carcinogen, is naturally found in rice.

"People who eat foods with inorganic arsenic every day have an increased risk of ," the authority said in a news release published on its website.

It added that parents should be "particularly careful" in relation to children due to their high intake relative to their body weight.

"Avoid rice drink and rice milk for children," the authority said in recommendations on rice products, adding that children should not be served rice-based hot every day.

It added that it had already begun new tests of other rice products to determine contents of inorganic arsenic, including products such as rice-based breakfast products and rice noodles. Analyses of these products were expected to be made public in July, the authority said.

In November 2012, US-based Consumerreports.org tested 200 different rice products finding both organic arsenic and "significant levels" of in almost all products. The organisation called for US federal standards to be introduced for arsenic in foodstuffs.

Explore further: Dietitian weighs in on controversy about arsenic in food: Eating a balanced diet will limit exposure to element

Related Stories

Dietitian weighs in on controversy about arsenic in food: Eating a balanced diet will limit exposure to element

November 15, 2012
(Medical Xpress)—Recent reports about arsenic in rice have sparked a great deal of panic among U.S. consumers. However, the average American who eats a variety of whole grains doesn't need to stress about arsenic, according ...

Genetically engineered rice: Protection from arsenic?

September 20, 2012
(Medical Xpress)—In an article this week, Consumer Reports is calling on the Food and Drug Administration to set standards for how much arsenic can be allowed in rice after finding the potential toxin in almost every rice ...

US urged to set standards for arsenic in rice

September 19, 2012
(AP)—The U.S. Food and Drug Administration may consider new standards for the levels of arsenic in rice as consumer groups are calling for federal guidance on how much of the carcinogen can be present in food.

Cooking tips to possibly lessen risk of arsenic in rice

October 8, 2012
Last month rice lovers got some bitter news. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration and Consumer Reports released studies showing "worrisome" levels of cancer-causing arsenic in many popular rices and rice products.

Recommended for you

Why sugary drinks and protein-rich meals don't go well together

July 20, 2017
Having a sugar-sweetened drink with a high-protein meal may negatively affect energy balance, alter food preferences and cause the body to store more fat, according to a study published in the open access journal BMC Nutrition.

Opioids and obesity, not 'despair deaths,' raising mortality rates for white Americans

July 20, 2017
Drug-related deaths among middle-aged white men increased more than 25-fold between 1980 and 2014, with the bulk of that spike occurring since the mid-1990s when addictive prescription opioids became broadly available, according ...

Aging Americans enjoy longer life, better health when avoiding three risky behaviors

July 20, 2017
We've heard it before from our doctors and other health experts: Keep your weight down, don't smoke and cut back on the alcohol if you want to live longer.

Parents have critical role in preventing teen drinking

July 20, 2017
Fewer teenagers are drinking alcohol but more needs to be done to curb the drinking habits of Australian school students, based on the findings of the latest study by Adelaide researchers.

Fresh fish oil lowers diabetes risk in rat offspring

July 19, 2017
Fresh fish oil given to overweight pregnant rats prevented their offspring from developing a major diabetes risk factor, Auckland researchers have found.

High-dose vitamin D doesn't appear to reduce the winter sniffles for children

July 18, 2017
Giving children high doses of vitamin D doesn't appear to reduce the winter sniffles, a new study has found.

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.