FDA approves once-a-day inhaler from Glaxo

May 10, 2013

The Food and Drug Administration says it has approved a new once-a-day inhaler drug from GlaxoSmithKline for patients with chronic lung disease.

The agency cleared the Breo Ellipta inhaler for long-term use and to control flare-ups in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disorder, often called smoker's cough. The lung ailment can cause a number of breathing problems, including and emphysema.

Breo Ellipta delivers a combination of two drugs that reduce inflammation in the lungs and relax airways to ease breathing. The drug carries a warning that it is not approved for asthma.

Glaxo, a leader in respiratory medicine, already sells the asthma treatment Advair, its best-selling product with more than $4 billion in sales per year. The British drugmaker collaborated on the inhaler with South San Francisco-based Theravance.

Explore further: US panel backs inhaler drug for lung disease

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