Inhaler approved for cystic fibrosis patients

March 25, 2013

(HealthDay)—The TOBI Podhaler (tobramycin inhalation powder) has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to treat cystic fibrosis patients infected with Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a bacterium that can damage the lungs.

Cystic fibrosis, affecting about 30,000 people in the United States, causes production of thick, sticky mucus that builds up in the lungs. This can lead to chronic bacterial infections, the FDA said in a news release.

The TOBI Podhaler, used twice daily, was evaluated in clinical trials involving 95 adults and children six years and older with . The most common side effects included cough, coughing up blood, shortness of breath, fever, mouth and throat pain, changes in voice and headache.

The antibiotic inhaler is marketed by Novartis, based in East Hanover, N.J.

Explore further: New proteins to clear the airways in cystic fibrosis and COPD

More information: Medline Plus has more about cystic fibrosis.

Related Stories

New proteins to clear the airways in cystic fibrosis and COPD

July 13, 2012
University of North Carolina scientists have uncovered a new strategy that may one day help people with cystic fibrosis and chronic obstructive pulmonary disorder better clear the thick and sticky mucus that clogs their lungs ...

Smoking cigarettes simulates cystic fibrosis

October 12, 2011
If you smoke cigarettes, you have more in common with someone who has cystic fibrosis than you think. A new research report appearing online in the FASEB Journal shows that smoking cigarettes affects the lungs in a way that ...

Scientists discover potential new target in fight against 'superbug'

January 29, 2013
University of Cambridge researchers have discovered how an antibiotic-resistant superbug exploits oxygen-limited conditions in the lungs of patients with severe respiratory disease to thrive.

Insights into a new therapy for a rare form of cystic fibrosis

October 29, 2012
Scientists at the Hospital for Sick Children in Toronto have established that a drug recently approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to treat a rare form of cystic fibrosis works in an unconventional way. Their ...

Recommended for you

Study suggests ending opioid epidemic will take years

July 20, 2017
The question of how to stem the nation's opioid epidemic now has a major detailed response. A new study chaired by University of Virginia School of Law Professor Richard Bonnie provides extensive recommendations for curbing ...

Team-based model reduces prescription opioid use among patients with chronic pain by 40 percent

July 17, 2017
A new, team-based, primary care model is decreasing prescription opioid use among patients with chronic pain by 40 percent, according to a new study out of Boston Medical Center's Grayken Center for Addiction Medicine, which ...

Private clinics' peddling of unproven stem cell treatments is unsafe and unethical

July 7, 2017
Stem cell science is an area of medical research that continues to offer great promise. But as this week's paper in Science Translational Medicine highlights, a growing number of clinics around the globe, including in Australia, ...

Popular heartburn drugs linked to higher death risk

July 4, 2017
Popular heartburn drugs called proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) have been linked to a variety of health problems, including serious kidney damage, bone fractures and dementia. Now, a new study from Washington University School ...

Most reproductive-age women using opioids also use another substance

June 30, 2017
The majority of reproductive-age and pregnant women who use opioids for non-medical purposes also use at least one other substance, ranging from nicotine or alcohol to cocaine, according to a University of Pittsburgh Graduate ...

At-risk chronic pain patients taper opioids successfully with psychological tools

June 28, 2017
Psychological support and new coping skills are helping patients at high risk of developing chronic pain and long-term, high-dose opioid use taper their opioids and rebuild their lives with activities that are meaningful ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.