Genetic variant may explain weight loss post-RYGB surgery

May 7, 2013
Genetic variant may explain weight loss post-RYGB surgery
A genetic variant associated with weight loss after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery has been identified, according to a study published in the May 2 issue of the American Journal of Human Genetics.

(HealthDay)—A genetic variant associated with weight loss after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) surgery has been identified, according to a study published in the May 2 issue of the American Journal of Human Genetics.

Ida J. Hatoum, Sc.D., from Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston, and colleagues performed a genome-wide association study involving 693 individuals undergoing RYGB to examine potential genetic factors associated with weight loss. Findings were replicated in an independent population of 327 individuals undergoing RYGB.

The researchers found that there was a significant correlation between a 15q26.1 locus near ST8SIA2 and SLCO3A1 and weight loss after RYGB. Baseline ST8SIA2 expression in omental fat of these individuals correlated significantly with post-RYGB weight loss. In addition, expression of St8sia2 and Slco3a1 was significantly altered in metabolically active tissues in RYGB-treated versus weight-matched sham-operated mice.

"We have identified a that is reproducibly associated with weight loss after RYGB," the authors write. "This study provides evidence for the use of genomics to identify response to surgical procedures (surgicogenomics)."

Several authors disclosed to Merck, which partially funded the study.

Explore further: Over long-term, gastric bypass surgery associated with higher rate of diabetes remission

More information: Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Related Stories

Over long-term, gastric bypass surgery associated with higher rate of diabetes remission

September 18, 2012
Severely obese patients who had Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery had significant weight loss that was sustained for an average of 6 years after the surgery and also experienced frequent remission and lower incidence of diabetes, ...

Calorie reduction, not bypass surgery, ups diabetes control

April 11, 2013
(HealthDay)—Calorie reduction rather than the actual Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) surgery seems to account for the improvement in glucose homeostasis in obese patients with type 2 diabetes who undergo RYGB, according ...

Gastric bypass surgery alters gut microbiota profile along the intestine

July 10, 2012
Research to be presented at the Annual Meeting of the Society for the Study of Ingestive Behavior (SSIB), the foremost society for research into all aspects of eating and drinking behavior, finds that gastric bypass surgery ...

Recommended for you

Gene variant activity is surprisingly variable between tissues

August 21, 2017
Every gene in almost every cell of the body is present in two variants called alleles—one from the mother, the other one from the father. In most cases, both alleles are active and transcribed by the cells into RNA. However, ...

Genome analysis with near-complete privacy possible, say researchers

August 17, 2017
It is now possible to scour complete human genomes for the presence of disease-associated genes without revealing any genetic information not directly associated with the inquiry, say Stanford University researchers.

Science Says: DNA test results may not change health habits

August 17, 2017
If you learned your DNA made you more susceptible to getting a disease, wouldn't you work to stay healthy?

Genetic variants found to play key role in human immune system

August 16, 2017
It is widely recognized that people respond differently to infections. This can partially be explained by genetics, shows a new study published today in Nature Communications by an international collaboration of researchers ...

Active non-coding DNA might help pinpoint genetic risk for psychiatric disorders

August 16, 2017
Northwestern Medicine scientists have demonstrated a new method of analyzing non-coding regions of DNA in neurons, which may help to pinpoint which genetic variants are most important to the development of schizophrenia and ...

Phenotype varies for presumed pathogenic variants in KCNB1

August 16, 2017
(HealthDay)—De novo KCNB1 missense and loss-of-function variants are associated with neurodevelopmental disorders, with or without seizures, according to a study published online Aug. 14 in JAMA Neurology.

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.