Melon focus headband turns to Kickstarter for rollout plans

May 17, 2013 by Nancy Owano weblog
Melon focus headband turns to Kickstarter for rollout plans

(Medical Xpress)—What if the quality of your work depends more on your focus on the piano keys or canvas or laptop than your musical or painting or computing skills? If target users can be convinced, they will make generous use of the Melon headband with its three electrodes placed against the forehead to track their mental concentration. This is a Kickstarter project. The Melon makers set a $100,000 goal to effect a full production run. At the time of this writing, they drew in $109,739. What is being offered is a headband and mobile app designed to help the person measure concentration and understand the person's focus highs and lows and try to improve.

The headband uses (EEG) to monitor . "Melon measures this global electrical activity by placing three electrodes on the forehead region, with the primary electrode on FP1. This allows Melon to monitor brainwave activity in the pre-frontal cortex," according to the makers. Melon partnered with NeuroSky in . The NeuroSky chip is embedded in the device. "We have partnered with a top producer of processing chips to access the best available algorithms for mental state detection."

According to Melon's team, the NeuroSky chip being used filters out the ambient waves present in most uncontrolled conditions and measures in any condition with 96% accuracy relative to similarly configured research grade EEGs.

The headband has a molded rubber exterior lined with neoprene. The headband is charged using micro-USB and it lasts about eight hours on a single charge.

As for the smartphone app, the user tells Melon what the activity is, and it will learn how well you focus on that activity. Melon's app delivers personalized tips (optional) when your focus dips too low (e.g., "Try taking deep breaths"). Insights appear at the ends of sessions and are stored as trends. The Melon team plans to make a SDK available for developers.

The price, at a Kickstarter introductory discount, starts at $79. Melon's team are Arye Barnehama and Laura Michelle Berman, former cognitive science students at Pomona College, and lead electrical engineer, Janus Ternullo.

Explore further: Bitter melon juice prevents pancreatic cancer in mouse models

More information: www.kickstarter.com/projects/8 … p-to-measure-your-fo

Related Stories

Bitter melon juice prevents pancreatic cancer in mouse models

March 12, 2013
A University of Colorado Cancer study published this week in the journal Carcinogenesis shows that bitter melon juice restricts the ability of pancreatic cancer cells to metabolize glucose, thus cutting the cells' energy ...

Recommended for you

The neural codes for body movements

July 21, 2017
A small patch of neurons in the brain can encode the movements of many body parts, according to researchers in the laboratory of Caltech's Richard Andersen, James G. Boswell Professor of Neuroscience, Tianqiao and Chrissy ...

Faulty support cells disrupt communication in brains of people with schizophrenia

July 20, 2017
New research has identified the culprit behind the wiring problems in the brains of people with schizophrenia. When researchers transplanted human brain cells generated from individuals diagnosed with childhood-onset schizophrenia ...

Scientists reveal how patterns of brain activity direct specific body movements

July 20, 2017
New research by Columbia scientists offers fresh insight into how the brain tells the body to move, from simple behaviors like walking, to trained movements that may take years to master. The discovery in mice advances knowledge ...

Scientists discover combined sensory map for heat, humidity in fly brain

July 20, 2017
Northwestern University neuroscientists now can visualize how fruit flies sense and process humidity and temperature together through a "sensory map" within their brains, according to new research.

Team traces masculinization in mice to estrogen receptor in inhibitory neurons

July 20, 2017
Researchers at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory (CSHL) have opened a black box in the brain whose contents explain one of the remarkable yet mysterious facts of life.

Speech language therapy delivered through the Internet leads to similar improvements as in-person treatment

July 20, 2017
Telerehabilitation helps healthcare professionals reach more patients in need, but some worry it doesn't offer the same quality of care as in-person treatment. This isn't the case, according to recent research by Baycrest.

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.