Psychology & Psychiatry

Theta waves: A marker of emotional regulation

Without realizing it, we all rely on emotional regulation many times a day. It's the process by which we mitigate the effect of disturbing stimuli in order to stay focused, improve our well-being and respond to demands from ...

Neuroscience

Walking gives the brain a 'step-up' in function for some

It has long been thought that when walking is combined with a task—both suffer. Researchers at the Del Monte Institute for Neuroscience at the University of Rochester found that this is not always the case. Some young and ...

Health

Your brain needs proper diet and exercise too

Healthy brain aging is a concern for all of us. June is recognized as Brain and Alzheimer's Awareness Month. It's normal to struggle with small things such as recalling names—and we all experience some slowing of the thought ...

Neuroscience

Brain imaging device based on quantum optical sensors

For years, Professor Lauri Parkkonen's team at Aalto University has been developing quantum optical sensors for measuring the brain's magnetic fields using a technique known as magnetoencephalography (MEG). In traditional ...

Alzheimer's disease & dementia

Mayo Clinic Q and A: 4 ways to reduce your risk of dementia

DEAR MAYO CLINIC: I am in my mid-40s and have two young children. My mother developed memory issues in her early 60s, and it has progressively worsened. Her sisters also have related issues. How can I reduce my risk—and ...

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Electroencephalography

Electroencephalography (EEG) is the recording of electrical activity along the scalp produced by the firing of neurons within the brain. In clinical contexts, EEG refers to the recording of the brain's spontaneous electrical activity over a short period of time, usually 20–40 minutes, as recorded from multiple electrodes placed on the scalp. In neurology, the main diagnostic application of EEG is in the case of epilepsy, as epileptic activity can create clear abnormalities on a standard EEG study. A secondary clinical use of EEG is in the diagnosis of coma and encephalopathies. EEG used to be a first-line method for the diagnosis of tumors, stroke and other focal brain disorders, but this use has decreased with the advent of anatomical imaging techniques such as MRI and CT.

Derivatives of the EEG technique include evoked potentials (EP), which involves averaging the EEG activity time-locked to the presentation of a stimulus of some sort (visual, somatosensory, or auditory). Event-related potentials refer to averaged EEG responses that are time-locked to more complex processing of stimuli; this technique is used in cognitive science, cognitive psychology, and psychophysiological research.

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