Neuroscience

Brain fingerprints help doctors detect neurological disease

An EPFL scientist has found that brain fingerprints—or maps of the neural connections within our brain—can be used to detect a decline in cognitive ability. That's because the fingerprints are harder to detect in people ...

Health

Aerobic exercise boosts healthy brain aging, study finds

Neuroscientists have long known that aerobic exercises, like walking, swimming, running, or biking, are largely beneficial for brain health. Now, new research out of Assistant Professor Aga Burzynska's BRAiN Lab at Colorado ...

Neuroscience

What does the sleeping brain think about?

We sleep, on average, one third of our time. But what does the brain do during these long hours? Using an artificial intelligence approach capable of decoding brain activity during sleep, scientists at the University of Geneva ...

Neuroscience

'Neuroprosthesis' restores words to man with paralysis

Researchers at UC San Francisco have successfully developed a "speech neuroprosthesis" that has enabled a man with severe paralysis to communicate in sentences, translating signals from his brain to the vocal tract directly ...

Neuroscience

A redundant modular network supports proper brain communication

Recall a phone number, or directions just recited, and your brain will be actively communicating across many regions. It is thought that working memory relies on interactions between these regions, but how these brain areas ...

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Electroencephalography

Electroencephalography (EEG) is the recording of electrical activity along the scalp produced by the firing of neurons within the brain. In clinical contexts, EEG refers to the recording of the brain's spontaneous electrical activity over a short period of time, usually 20–40 minutes, as recorded from multiple electrodes placed on the scalp. In neurology, the main diagnostic application of EEG is in the case of epilepsy, as epileptic activity can create clear abnormalities on a standard EEG study. A secondary clinical use of EEG is in the diagnosis of coma and encephalopathies. EEG used to be a first-line method for the diagnosis of tumors, stroke and other focal brain disorders, but this use has decreased with the advent of anatomical imaging techniques such as MRI and CT.

Derivatives of the EEG technique include evoked potentials (EP), which involves averaging the EEG activity time-locked to the presentation of a stimulus of some sort (visual, somatosensory, or auditory). Event-related potentials refer to averaged EEG responses that are time-locked to more complex processing of stimuli; this technique is used in cognitive science, cognitive psychology, and psychophysiological research.

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