Report reveals impact of public injecting

May 20, 2013, Monash University

New research undertaken on the streets of Richmond and Abbotsford has revealed increasing health risks for people who inject drugs and significant community concern over the impact of injecting in public areas.

The Burnet Institute report, North Richmond Public Injecting Impact Study, by Dr Robyn Dwyer, Professor Robert Power and Professor Paul Dietze was released today.

The researchers identified increasing high rates of heroin-related overdose attendances by Ambulance Victoria. The City of Yarra had the highest number of attendances of any local government in Melbourne. There was a four-fold increase in the past two years in the collection of needles and syringes from street-sweeps; and a lack of access to sterile injecting equipment after hours and on weekends leading to a medium to high risk of blood-borne amongst people who re-used syringes.

Burnet's Professor Paul Dietze, jointly based in Monash University's Department of Epidemiology and , said new public health responses were needed to address the public injecting issues in North Richmond.

"Our research identifies two main priorities; to improve access to harm reduction services and materials, and a need to improve public amenity for those who live and work in the area," Professor Dietze said.

"Effective public health responses require whole-of-community, holistic strategies that balance the requirements of health with those of law enforcement to reduce harm to individuals and the community."

Among the report's 13 recommendations are the need to extend hours and coverage of needle syringe programs to ensure 24-hour access; greater collaboration between Police and local services to encourage service use; and the need to encourage people who inject drugs to take control of their and safety.

Data collected included structured observations, interviews with key stakeholders (including local traders , welfare and community workers, police, people who inject drugs and and residents), and secondary indicators such as needle and syringe disposal, and Ambulance Victoria data.

Explore further: New antiviral treatment could significantly reduce global burden of hepatitis C

More information: www.burnet.edu.au/news/249_rep … ng_in_north_richmond

Related Stories

New antiviral treatment could significantly reduce global burden of hepatitis C

May 6, 2013
(Medical Xpress)—Around 150 million people globally are chronically infected with the hepatitis C virus (HCV) – a major cause of liver disease and the fastest growing cause of liver transplantation and liver cancer. ...

Alprazolam and heroin related deaths

March 4, 2013
(Medical Xpress)—A powerful anti-anxiety drug has been involved in a rising number of heroin-related deaths (HRDs) in Victoria in recent years, according to new research.

STOP Obesity Alliance encourages nonprofit hospitals to address obesity via CHB requirements

April 30, 2013
The nation's more than 2,900 nonprofit hospitals are facing new requirements to qualify for federal tax-exempt status under the Affordable Care Act, including producing a Community Health Needs Assessment that identifies ...

Health impact assessments prove critical public health tool

April 22, 2013
As natural gas development expands nationwide, policymakers, communities and public health experts are increasingly turning to health impact assessments (HIA) as a means of predicting the effects of drilling on local communities, ...

Recommended for you

Americans are getting more sleep

January 19, 2018
Although more than one in three Americans still don't get enough sleep, a new analysis shows first signs of success in the fight for more shut eye. According to data from 181,335 respondents aged 15 and older who participated ...

Wine is good for you—to a point

January 18, 2018
The Mediterranean diet has become synonymous with healthy eating, but there's one thing in it that stands out: It's cool to drink wine.

Sleep better, lose weight?

January 17, 2018
(HealthDay)—Sleeplessness could cost you when it's time to stand on your bathroom scale, a new British study suggests.

Who uses phone apps to track sleep habits? Mostly the healthy and wealthy in US

January 16, 2018
The profile of most Americans who use popular mobile phone apps that track sleep habits is that they are relatively affluent, claim to eat well, and say they are in good health, even if some of them tend to smoke.

Improvements in mortality rates are slowed by rise in obesity in the United States

January 15, 2018
With countless medical advances and efforts to curb smoking, one might expect that life expectancy in the United States would improve. Yet according to recent studies, there's been a reduction in the rate of improvement in ...

Can muesli help against arthritis?

January 15, 2018
It is well known that healthy eating increases a general sense of wellbeing. Researchers at Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg (FAU) have now discovered that a fibre-rich diet can have a positive influence ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.