Systematic screening of med adherence will ID barriers

May 22, 2013
Systematic screening of med adherence will ID barriers
Implementation of systematic monitoring for medication adherence will allow for identification of barriers to adherence and tailoring of interventions, according to a viewpoint piece published in the May 22/29 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

(HealthDay)—Implementation of systematic monitoring for medication adherence will allow for identification of barriers to adherence and tailoring of interventions, according to a viewpoint piece published in the May 22/29 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Zachary A. Marcum, Pharm.D., from the University of Pittsburg, and colleagues discuss the issues surrounding detection and treatment of medication non-adherence.

The authors note that most clinicians are not formally trained in screening for or diagnosing medication non-adherence. At least six medication non-adherence phenotypes have been identified and each requires distinct diagnostic tools and treatments. To have public health effects, measures of should be recorded in the electronic health record, which would allow for sharing among and insurers and establishment of trends. After routinely screening for medication non-adherence in adults, barriers should be identified for treatments for specific conditions. Attempts have been made to improve medication adherence, with education interventions with behavioral support effective for several chronic diseases at the patient level. Few studies have specifically recruited participants with difficulties in medication adherence or targeted participants' barriers to adherence.

"Based on identified barriers derived from systematic screening, patient-tailored interventions can be delivered in a safe, effective, and efficient manner, with systematic monitoring over time due to the dynamic process of medication adherence," the authors write. "Synergism among multiple disciplines is necessary to successfully improve medication adherence for adults."

Explore further: Physicians don't adequately monitor patients' medication adherence

More information: Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Related Stories

Physicians don't adequately monitor patients' medication adherence

July 16, 2012
Patients' non-adherence to prescribed medication costs the U.S. health care system an estimated $290 billion annually and can lead to poor clinical outcomes, increased hospitalizations and higher mortality.

Meds adherence self-report valid in type 2 diabetes

December 20, 2012
(HealthDay)—Self-reported measures of medication adherence in adults with type 2 diabetes are valid, although some self-reports are moderated by depression, according to a study published online Nov. 30 in Diabetes Care.

Medication: Take it, leave it or sometimes forget

February 12, 2013
Patients on medication for long-term conditions can often face difficulties with taking their medication as directed by their doctor.  In addition to the potentially detrimental effect on their health, the cost to the NHS ...

Parental problems prevent children taking much-needed asthma medication

September 4, 2012
Vienna, Austria: Parental problems and a chaotic home environment could be preventing children from taking their prescribed asthma medication.

Can insurers save money by providing free diabetes-related medications and supplies?

February 20, 2013
Reducing financial barriers to medication access—a strategy known as value-based insurance design (VBID)—can improve medication adherence and management of chronic diseases such as diabetes. The economic and patient-perceived ...

Mediterranean diet adherence cuts cognitive impairment

April 29, 2013
(HealthDay)—Greater adherence to a Mediterranean diet (MeD) is associated with a lower likelihood of incident cognitive impairment (ICI), especially among those without diabetes, according to a study published in the April ...

Recommended for you

High-fat diet in pregnancy can cause mental health problems in offspring

July 21, 2017
A high-fat diet not only creates health problems for expectant mothers, but new research in an animal model suggests it alters the development of the brain and endocrine system of their offspring and has a long-term impact ...

To combat teen smoking, health experts recommend R ratings for movies that depict tobacco use

July 21, 2017
Public health experts have an unusual suggestion for reducing teen smoking: Give just about any movie that depicts tobacco use an automatic R rating.

Why sugary drinks and protein-rich meals don't go well together

July 20, 2017
Having a sugar-sweetened drink with a high-protein meal may negatively affect energy balance, alter food preferences and cause the body to store more fat, according to a study published in the open access journal BMC Nutrition.

Opioids and obesity, not 'despair deaths,' raising mortality rates for white Americans

July 20, 2017
Drug-related deaths among middle-aged white men increased more than 25-fold between 1980 and 2014, with the bulk of that spike occurring since the mid-1990s when addictive prescription opioids became broadly available, according ...

Aging Americans enjoy longer life, better health when avoiding three risky behaviors

July 20, 2017
We've heard it before from our doctors and other health experts: Keep your weight down, don't smoke and cut back on the alcohol if you want to live longer.

Parents have critical role in preventing teen drinking

July 20, 2017
Fewer teenagers are drinking alcohol but more needs to be done to curb the drinking habits of Australian school students, based on the findings of the latest study by Adelaide researchers.

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.