Factors influencing delay in breast cancer treatment differ for African-American and white women

July 10, 2013, University of North Carolina Health Care

Different factors influence delay between diagnosis and first course of treatment for breast cancer for African-American and White women.

The study used data from the Carolina Breast Cancer Study (CBCS) Phase III, a program of UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center. Scientists found that among White women, household size and due to one's were reasons for delay in treatment, while among African-American women, the type of treatment received influenced delay. Both African-American and White women experienced delay if they underwent immediate following . African-American women were more likely than White women to experience delay associated with this procedure (92.5 percent versus 60.6 percent).

The study was published in the July 3, 2013 issue of Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention, a journal of the American Association for Cancer Research.

The researchers categorized women into two groups: those who received treatment within 30 days of diagnosis, and those whose treatment was delayed by more than 30 days.

"Our goal was to identify the factors that contribute to treatment delay and to assess whether disparities in delay exist between African-American and White women," said Sasha McGee, PhD, an epidemiology graduate student at the University of North Carolina Gillings School of Global Public Health at the time of this study.

The study found that African-American women between the ages of 20 and 49 were more than three times as likely as White women in this age range to experience treatment delay.

"The study results suggest that specific populations of women need to be targeted when characterizing and addressing determinants of treatment delay, and that younger African-American women may benefit from interventions to reduce disparities in treatment delay," said McGee.

The study population consisted of 601 women with between the ages of 20 and 74, who were enrolled in the CBCS between 2008 and 2010. The CBCS is an ongoing population-based study that recruits women from 44 counties in in North Carolina. "We used information from interviews and questionnaires to collect socioeconomic data for each woman," McGee added. "Larger studies often use area-level information for groups of people [e.g. based on census data] and apply these data to individuals in the study, which may not always be accurate." Clinical and treatment information were obtained by reviewing the medical records for each study participant.

"One of the goals of the CBCS Phase III is to assess five- and ten-year survival for study participants once recruitment ends in 2014. Follow-up interviews for study participants will continue for up to five years after diagnosis, therefore not only will we be able to evaluate the impact of a treatment delay of more than 30 days on survival, but also the impact of barriers to and healthcare access," said McGee.

Explore further: Initiation of breast cancer treatment varies by race; patient-doctor communication is key

Related Stories

Initiation of breast cancer treatment varies by race; patient-doctor communication is key

May 7, 2013
Black women with breast cancer were found to be three times more likely than their white counterparts to delay treatment for more than 90 days—a time delay associated with increased deaths from the disease, according to ...

African Americans experience longer delay between prostate cancer diagnosis and treatment

April 1, 2013
African American men on average wait a week longer than their Caucasian counterparts between the initial diagnosis of prostate cancer and treatment, according to University of North Carolina researchers.

African Americans experience longer delays between diagnosis and treatment of prostate cancer

May 28, 2013
Among men with prostate cancer, African Americans experience longer treatment delays after being diagnosed than Caucasians. That is the finding of an analysis published early online in CANCER, a peer-reviewed journal of the ...

Breast CA tx delays still more common for poor, uninsured

April 25, 2013
(HealthDay)—For young women with breast cancer, a longer treatment delay time (TDT) is associated with decreased survival, especially for African-American women, those with public or no insurance, and those with low socioeconomic ...

Black women have worse breast cancer mortality regardless of cancer subtype

April 8, 2013
Black women with breast cancer had significantly worse survival compared with other racial and ethnic groups across cancer subtypes, which suggests that the survival differences are not solely attributable to the fact that ...

Recommended for you

Researchers develop swallowable test to detect pre-cancerous Barrett's esophagus

January 17, 2018
Investigators at Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine and University Hospitals Cleveland Medical Center have developed a simple, swallowable test for early detection of Barrett's esophagus that offers promise ...

Scientists zoom in to watch DNA code being read

January 17, 2018
Scientists have unveiled incredible images of how the DNA code is read and interpreted—revealing new detail about one of the fundamental processes of life.

Dulling cancer therapy's double-edged sword

January 17, 2018
Researchers have discovered that killing cancer cells can actually have the unintended effect of fueling the proliferation of residual, living cancer cells, ultimately leading to aggressive tumor progression.

Presurgical targeted therapy delays relapse of high-risk stage 3 melanoma

January 17, 2018
A pair of targeted therapies given before and after surgery for melanoma produced at least a six-fold increase in time to progression compared to standard-of-care surgery for patients with stage 3 disease, researchers at ...

T-cells engineered to outsmart tumors induce clinical responses in relapsed Hodgkin lymphoma

January 16, 2018
WASHINGTON-(Jan. 16, 2018)-Tumors have come up with ingenious strategies that enable them to evade detection and destruction by the immune system. So, a research team that includes Children's National Health System clinician-researchers ...

Researchers identify new treatment target for melanoma

January 16, 2018
Researchers in the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania have identified a new therapeutic target for the treatment of melanoma. For decades, research has associated female sex and a history of previous ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.