Study profiles inpatient peds dermatology consultations

July 19, 2013
Study profiles inpatient peds dermatology consultations
Pediatric dermatologists are consulted for patients ranging in age from newborn to 17 years, with the most common diagnostic categories being infectious diseases, graft-versus-host-disease, and dermatitis, according to a retrospective study published in the June issue of the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology.

(HealthDay)—Pediatric dermatologists are consulted for patients ranging in age from newborn to 17 years, with the most common diagnostic categories being infectious diseases, graft-versus-host-disease, and dermatitis, according to a retrospective study published in the June issue of the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology.

Patrick McMahon, M.D., from the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, and colleagues retrospectively reviewed the of 427 consecutive pediatric dermatology consultations from January 2006 to April 2010. They recorded the age, gender, diagnosis, requesting service, number of skin biopsies performed, and reason for admission to the hospital.

The researchers found that patients ranged in age from newborn to 17 years old, with 18 percent of patients aged 6 weeks to 11 months. General pediatrics most frequently requested pediatric dermatology consultations, accounting for 44 percent of all consultations. Infectious diseases, graft-versus-host disease, dermatitis, vascular anomalies, and drug eruptions were the most common diagnostic categories. Infections and vascular anomalies were the most common diagnoses when hospitalization was primarily for skin-related disease. Infections and drug eruptions were most common reasons for admission for skin disease associated with a systemic illness.

"The results of our study inform both dermatologists and pediatric hospitalists about the array of conditions pediatric dermatologist consultants manage in a tertiary care children's hospital," the authors write. "They can be used to create or modify a dermatology curriculum for pediatric residents and fellows, hospitalists, and other staff, focusing on the most common and important diagnoses encountered."

One author disclosed financial ties to Pierre-Fabre Dermatology.

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