New technologies and ingredients provide better options for gluten-free eating

July 17, 2013, Institute of Food Technologists

New technologies and ingredients are improving the taste, appearance and nutritional content of gluten-free food products, a market that is expected to grow to $6 billion by 2017, according to a presentation today at the 2013 Institute of Food Technologists (IFT) Annual Meeting & Food Expo in Chicago.

An estimated one in 133 Americans has celiac disease, an immune disorder triggered by the ingestion of gluten peptides found in wheat, barley and rye, said Joseph Baumert, Ph.D., assistant professor in the Department of Food Science & Technology and co-director of the Food Allergy Research & Resource Program at the University of Nebraska.

A growing number of consumers with celiac disease, those with a "sensitivity" to gluten, and/or those with preference for gluten-free foods are driving the demand for these products, said Chris Thomas, senior food technologist at Ingredion, Inc.

"Historically, product development has focused on the 'gluten-free' aspects,'" said Thomas. "Now, consumers want nutrition quality, variety and ."

Because of manufacturing and ingredient challenges, gluten-free products often have a gritty or dry texture and a short shelf life. To mask or enhance a bland taste, some have high amounts of sugar and little nutritional value. Fortunately, innovative manufacturing technologies are improving the texture of gluten-free products and the development and use of flours, starches and bran made from alternative ingredients, are enhancing taste and appearance.

Utilizing "native functional flours based on tapioca and rice, we're able to achieve texture, color and appearance that is similar to wheat-containing products while eliminating grittiness and crumbliness," said Thomas. In addition, these products are similar to wheat-products in calories, fat content, overall nutrition and shelf life.

Pulses—the edible seeds of leguminous crops—also are being used to create flour and starch-like substances in gluten-free products, said Mehmet Tulbek, Ph.D, the global director of the research, development and innovation division of Alliance Grain Traders (AGT). These ingredients, made from peas, lentils, chickpeas and edible beans, have a high viscosity, as well as high levels of protein, fiber and other nutrients. They're also low-fat and attractive to vegetarian consumers.

To date, pulses are successfully being used to create gluten-free pasta, baked goods, snacks, breadcrumb substitutes in meatballs, and even milk-like beverages in the international market.

"Pulse ingredients were found to be suitable for gluten-free expanded snack, pasta, meat and beverage products," said Tulbek. "Overall, the ingredients are working very well."

Explore further: Gluten and lactose-free ingredient substitute found for low-fat white sauces

Related Stories

Gluten and lactose-free ingredient substitute found for low-fat white sauces

October 17, 2012
Consumers are increasingly demanding the development of ready-to-eat gluten and lactose-free food products that meet their needs and help improve their health. A recent study in Journal of Food Science, published by the Institute ...

Celiac disease shouldn't keep family from BBQ fun: experts

July 4, 2013
(HealthDay)—Attending a Fourth of July barbecue or picnic can be great fun for the whole family, but parents need to take special precautions if one of their children has celiac disease, an expert warns.

Going gluten-free: Is the diet a good fit for everyone?

June 28, 2012
(Medical Xpress) -- One of the latest trends in the food market and among celebrities is going gluten-free. Snack giant Frito-Lay has announced it will introduce new gluten-free labels and products, and Miley Cyrus has credited ...

Pasta made from green banana flour a tasty alternative for gluten-free diets

June 22, 2012
People with celiac disease struggle with limited food choices, as their condition makes them unable to tolerate gluten, found in wheat and other grains. Researchers from the University of Brazil have developed a gluten-free ...

Recommended for you

Women run faster after taking newly developed supplement, study finds

January 19, 2018
A new study found that women who took a specially prepared blend of minerals and nutrients for a month saw their 3-mile run times drop by almost a minute.

Americans are getting more sleep

January 19, 2018
Although more than one in three Americans still don't get enough sleep, a new analysis shows first signs of success in the fight for more shut eye. According to data from 181,335 respondents aged 15 and older who participated ...

Wine is good for you—to a point

January 18, 2018
The Mediterranean diet has become synonymous with healthy eating, but there's one thing in it that stands out: It's cool to drink wine.

Sleep better, lose weight?

January 17, 2018
(HealthDay)—Sleeplessness could cost you when it's time to stand on your bathroom scale, a new British study suggests.

Who uses phone apps to track sleep habits? Mostly the healthy and wealthy in US

January 16, 2018
The profile of most Americans who use popular mobile phone apps that track sleep habits is that they are relatively affluent, claim to eat well, and say they are in good health, even if some of them tend to smoke.

Improvements in mortality rates are slowed by rise in obesity in the United States

January 15, 2018
With countless medical advances and efforts to curb smoking, one might expect that life expectancy in the United States would improve. Yet according to recent studies, there's been a reduction in the rate of improvement in ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.