No link between sleep, fatigue level: research

August 1, 2013

New Swedish research has shown that there is little or no relation between how much sleep people get at night and how fatigued they feel, the head researcher said Thursday.

"The length of sleep is not a good measurement to analyse whether we get enough sleep or not," Torbjoern Aakerstedt told AFP of the studies conducted at the Stress Research Institute of Stockholm University.

"It's genetically conditioned and dependent on age and health," he said.

Aakerstedt's team has conducted three different studies, one of which investigated the of nearly 6,000 individuals.

The research suggests that the number of hours slept is of much less importance in determining how a person functions throughout the day.

"If you feel fine and dynamic during the day, you've probably slept enough," said Aakerstedt.

The research, to be published later this year, found the average number of hours slept during a working week is six hours 55 minutes, with an extra hour's sleep during holidays.

The researcher said that 20-year-olds should sleep eight hours on average, whilst 60-year-olds require only six.

"But there is no general average," Aakerstedt added. "Twenty-year-olds can sleep even more, but still be tired during the day" as their brain is still developing.

Yet, although more sleep does not mean more energy, no one should sleep too little, as it affects one's health, he said.

Too little sleep can result in a weak immune system, , , , workplace incidents and .

Explore further: To sleep: perchance to dream ...

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Sinister1811
3 / 5 (4) Aug 01, 2013
So they are suggesting that evolution developed sleep patterns for no apparent reason? And if you were to get 1 or 2 hours sleep, it would have no overall effect on energy levels or functioning? These guys have never suffered from a sleep disorder. Then again, someone had to get paid.
Sinister1811
3 / 5 (4) Aug 01, 2013
This might be true for CFS, but not true for sleep in general.

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