Non-celiac gluten sensitivity's existence questioned

Non-celiac gluten sensitivity's existence questioned
There is no evidence that gluten is a trigger in patients with non-celiac gluten sensitivity placed on a low fermentable, oligo-, di-, monosaccharides, and polyols diet, according to a study published in the August issue of Gastroenterology.

(HealthDay)—There is no evidence that gluten is a trigger in patients with non-celiac gluten sensitivity (NCGS) placed on a low fermentable, oligo-, di-, monosaccharides, and polyols (FODMAP) diet, according to a study published in the August issue of Gastroenterology.

Jessica R. Biesiekierski, Ph.D., from Monash University in Box Hill, Australia, and colleagues randomly assigned 37 subjects (aged 24 to 61 years; six men) with NCGS and irritable bowel syndrome (based on Rome III criteria), but not celiac disease, to a two-week diet of reduced FODMAPs followed by placement on either a high-gluten (16 g gluten/d), low-gluten (2 g gluten/d and 14 g whey protein/d), or control (16 g whey protein/d) diet for one week, followed by a washout period of at least two weeks. Serum and fecal markers of /injury and immune activation were assessed, as were indices of fatigue. Subsequently, 22 participants crossed over to groups given gluten (16 g/d), whey (16 g/d), or control (no additional protein) diets for three days.

The researchers found that consistently and significantly improved during reduced FODMAP intake, but significantly worsened to a similar degree when their diets included gluten or . Only 8 percent of participants had gluten-specific effects. No changes in any biomarkers were diet-specific. Participants' symptoms increased by similar levels among groups during the three-day rechallenge, but gluten-specific gastrointestinal effects were not reproduced. The researchers observed an order effect.

"In a placebo-controlled, cross-over rechallenge study, we found no evidence of specific or dose-dependent effects of gluten in patients with NCGS placed [on] diets low in FODMAPs," the authors write.

One author has published a book on a diet for .


Explore further

FDA defining what "gluten free" means on packages

More information: Abstract
Full Text
Editorial
Journal information: Gastroenterology

Copyright © 2013 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

Citation: Non-celiac gluten sensitivity's existence questioned (2013, August 23) retrieved 17 September 2021 from https://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-08-non-celiac-gluten-sensitivity.html
This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.
 shares

Feedback to editors