Prolactin reduces arthritis inflammation

August 1, 2013, Journal of Clinical Investigation

Inflammatory joint diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis are the result of cartilage damage and loss. Chondrocytes are the only cells that are found in cartilage and their death is linked to decreased cartilage health.

In this issue of the Journal of Clinical Investigation, Carmen Clapp and colleagues at the National University of Mexico identify prolactin as a potential treatment for inflammatory joint disease.

Prolactin treatment prevented chondrocyte death and associated cartilage degradation. In a rat model of inflammatory arthritis, prolactin treatment reduced inflammation, bone erosion, joint swelling, and pain.

This study indicates that prolactin therapy has the potential to relieve many symptoms associated with rheumatoid arthritis and other inflammatory-related diseases.

Explore further: Can stem cells help those with arthritis?

More information: Prolactin promotes cartilage survival and attenuates inflammation in inflammatory arthritis, J Clin Invest. doi:10.1172/JCI69485

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