EHR systems meeting meaningful use criteria beneficial

September 18, 2013
EHR systems meeting meaningful use criteria beneficial
Most electronic health record systems meet meaningful use criteria, and these systems are associated with time-saving and other benefits, according to a September data brief published by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's National Center for Health Statistics.

(HealthDay)—Most electronic health record (EHR) systems meet meaningful use criteria, and these systems are associated with time-saving and other benefits, according to a September data brief published by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's National Center for Health Statistics.

Eric Jamoom, Ph.D., M.P.H., from the CDC in Atlanta, and colleagues used data from the National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey's 2011 Physician Workflow Survey to describe physicians experiences with EHRs, comparing clinical and financial indicators for EHR systems that do and do not meet meaningful use criteria.

According to the report, of the physicians with EHR systems, about three-quarters (76 percent) had systems that meet meaningful use criteria. Time savings were more likely to be reported by physicians with EHR systems that meet meaningful use criteria, but this was limited to certain areas. Systems that meet meaningful use criteria were more likely to be associated with physician reports of enhanced and less disruption on physician interaction with patients. Financial benefits and selected clinical benefits were no more likely among physicians with systems that meet meaningful use criteria.

"The findings indicate common challenges of using EHR systems, including increased time spent documenting care and the disruption of patient interactions," the authors write. "The findings suggest that most physicians have experienced various clinical and financial benefits, as well as practice efficiencies, from using EHR systems, with physicians using an EHR system that meets meaningful use criteria reporting greater specific time-saving benefits."

Explore further: Few physicians meeting meaningful use in early 2012

More information: More Information

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